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EVENTS

2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008
 

*Please note this is a selected list of Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government events. For complete listings, please explore individual program websites.

 

FALL SEMESTER 2009 -

September 17 | Business & Government Seminar Series

Health Care Reform | VIDEO

Paul O'Neill
Paul H. O’Neill was appointed the 72nd Secretary of the Treasury Department in 2001 by President George W. Bush. O’Neill started his career in government service under President Nixon and continued working under Presidents Ford and Reagan.   Under the former administrations he acted as a computer systems analyst from 1961-1967 (Ford) in the U.S. Veterans Administration and as staff member/Deputy Director of the Office Management and Budget (OMB) from 1967-1977. After working with the OMB he left the Government in order to pursue business interests in the private sector. Secretary O’Neill came to the Treasury Department with several years of experience as the Chairman and CEO of aluminum giant Alcoa. During this time O’Neill managed a corporation of more than 140,000 employees world wide.

Months after O’Neill was appointed Treasury Secretary, the country faced the most horrific terrorist attacks in its history, 9/11 (September 11, 2001). The events surrounding 9/11 precipitated a sudden downturn in U.S. economic growth, closely tied to economic uncertainty worldwide. Secretary O’Neill helped restore confidence in the economy by vowing to eliminate the funding source of terrorist attacks which continually threatened America’s peace and prosperity.

As a testament to Secretary O’Neill’s work ethic and dedication to public service, he has been awarded many honorary doctorates over the years from various universities. He has also served on a wide variety of committees including the American Red Cross, Committee for Economic Development, Joint Council on Economic Education, Institute for International Economics, and National Leadership Commission on Health Care.

Click here for additional biographical information.

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September 24 | Business & Government Seminar Series

Regulation, Financial Innovation, and the Current Economic Crisis | VIDEO
The presentation will analyze changes in the laws and policies affecting the regulation of financial intermediaries, show how those changes facilitated innovations in finance, and show how some of the innovations aggravated the recent economic crisis.  It will then address the more fundamental question:  have recent financial innovations significantly enhanced the ability of the United States to maintain abundant supplies of capital investment and the technological innovations that drive economic prosperity?

F.M. Scherer
Professor of Public Policy and Corporate Management in the Aetna Chair, Emeritus
Faculty Chair of the Regulatory Policy Program, M-RCBG
Harvard Kennedy School

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September 25 | Business & Government Seminar Series

Regulation of Consumer Financial Products
This panel discussion will evaluate the existing regulation of consumer financial products and the proposed legislation to create a Financial Product Safety Commission. How are consumer financial products like mortgages, credit cards, savings products, and insurance products currently regulated? How well is the current regulatory structure working? What would the proposed Financial Product Safety Commission do, and to what extent would it actually improve regulation of consumer financial products? What is the status of the proposed legislation and what are its prospects for approval? What are some models for thinking about consumer financial products should be regulated?

Daniel Carpenter
Freed Professor of Government
Faculty of Arts & Sciences, Harvard University

Howell Jackson
James S. Reid, Jr. Professor of Law
Harvard Law School

Brigitte Madrian (panel Chair)
Aetna Professor of Public Policy and Corporate Management
Harvard Kennedy School

Jim Segel
Special Counsel to House Financial Services Committee Chair Barney Frank

Peter Tufano
Sylvan C. Coleman Professor of Financial Management 
Harvard Business School

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October 1 | CSRI Student Event

Student Feedback Session with AllWorld Networks

Click Here For More Information

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October 1 | Business & Government Seminar Series

Excessive Salaries on Wall Street: A Focus on Wages and Human Capital | VIDEO | PAPER

This seminar will review information about wages, education and occupations to shed light on the evolution of the U.S. financial sector over the past century. Financial jobs were relatively skill intensive, complex, and highly paid until the 1930s and after the 1980s, but not in the interim period. We will discuss the determinants of this evolution and show that financial deregulation and corporate activities linked to IPOs and credit risk increase the demand for skills in financial jobs. Computers and information technology play a more limited role. Our analysis will show that wages in finance were excessively high around 1930 and from the mid 1990s until 2006. For the recent period, rents accounted for 30% to 50% of the wage differential between the financial sector and the rest of the private sector. The paper on which the discussion will be based can be found here.

Thomas Philippon
Assistant Professor of Finance
Stern School of Business, New York University

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October 6

Prospects for Japan's Revival: DPJ, Economic Policy, and Company Innovation

Richard Katz, Editor-in-Chief, The Oriental Economist

Richard Katz is the author of Japan: The System That Soured—The Rise and Fall of the Japanese Economic Miracle (M.E. Sharpe 1998), which was named by Toyo Keizai as “one of the 20 books needed to understand the 21st century”; and Japanese Phoenix: The Long Road to Economic Revival (M.E. Sharpe, 2003). His writings have also appeared in Foreign Affairs, The Washington Quarterly, The International Economy Magazine, The New York Times, Financial Times, Asahi Evening News, Asian Wall Street Journal and many others. He has testified to the Congressional committees, most recently to the Congressional Oversight Panel regarding lessons of Japan’s banking crisis for the current U.S. financial crisis. Mr. Katz has also taught courses on the Japanese economy at the New York University Stern School of Business, and at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Stony Brook. For more information on the Oriental Economist, please see: http://www.orientaleconomist.com/index.html.       

Andrei Hagiu, Assistant Professor of Business Administration (Strategy Group), Harvard Business School

Andrei Hagiu’s (http://www.people.hbs.edu/ahagiu/) research focuses on multi-sided markets, which feature platforms serving two or more distinct groups of customers.  He has also conducted extensive research on competition and industrial policy in Japan, China, and in the U.S., and has been a Research Fellow at the Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI, Tokyo). He is the co-author of Invisible Engines: How Software Platforms Drive Innovation and Transform Industries (with David Evans and Richard Schmalensee, MIT Press, 2006).  His articles have appeared in Harvard Business Review, Review of Network Economics, Rand Journal of Economics, Journal of Economics and Management Strategy, and HBS Working Paper series. His recent co-authored paper, “Capitalizing on Innovation: The Case of Japan,” is available at: http://www.hbs.edu/research/pdf/09-114.pdf.

Co-sponsored by the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies

Special Series on Common Problems of Advanced Industrial Democracies

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THIS SEMINAR HAS BEEN POSTPONED

Business & Government Seminar Series
Bell Hall (5th floor, Belfer Building)
12:30-2:00 pm, Lunch provided: RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

“The Value of Political Connections in the United States”
Daron Acemoglu, Simon Johnson, Amir Kermani, James Kwak, and Todd Mitton

The announcement of Timothy Geithner as President Obama's nominee for Treasury Secretary in November 2008 produced a cumulative abnormal return for Geithner-connected financial firms of around 15 percent from day 0 (when the announcement was first leaked) to day 10. The quantitative effect is comparable to standard findings in emerging markets with weak institutions, and much higher than previous studies have found for the United States or other relatively rich democracies. The results hold when we control for how much firms were affected by the financial crisis, when we use matching estimators, and we apply a wide range of other robustness checks.

There were subsequently abnormal negative returns for connected firms when the news broke that Geithner's confirmation might be derailed by tax issues. Since the Geithner nomination announcement, policy has been supportive of the financial services sector and Geithner-connected firms have continued to show positive cumulative abnormal returns, but there is no compelling evidence that Treasury implemented the exact form of favoritism implied by the stock market reaction. Our results pick up market expectations and the perceived value of connections at a moment of intense financial crisis, rather than how policy was subsequently designed or implemented.

Simon Johnson
Ronald A. Kurtz (1954) Professor of Entrepreneurship
Professor of Global Economics and Management
MIT Sloan School of Management

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October 15 | Business & Government Seminar Series

The European CO2 Emissions Trading System | VIDEO
As a cap-and-trade system, the EU ETS is at once the first one for CO2 emissions, the largest such market yet created in value and number of covered installations, and the first multinational system. The talk will review and draw lessons from the EU ETS experience to date.

Denny Ellerman
Dr. Ellerman is recently retired as Senior Lecturer at the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is an internationally recognized expert on energy and environmental economics with a particular focus on emissions trading. He is the author of numerous publications on emissions trading, including being co-author of the forthcoming Pricing Carbon: The European Emissions Trading Scheme.

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October 20 | Business & Government Seminar Series

Health Care Reform

Atul Gawande, M.D.
Associate Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School
Associate Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard School of Public Health
Research Director, Center for Surgery and Public Health, Brigham and Women's Hospital

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October 22
Business & Government Seminar Series

VIDEO

Tom Healey
Senior Fellow, M-RCBG
Harvard Kennedy School

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November 10 | Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

Getting Serious about Climate Change in the Post-Kyoto Era

Robert N.Stavins
Albert Pratt Professor of Business & Government
Harvard Kennedy School
Director, Harvard Environmental Economics Program

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November 19 | Business & Government Seminar Series

Rising Tide? Is growth in emerging economies good for the United States?

Robert Lawrence
Albert L. Williams Professor of International Trade and Investment, Harvard Kennedy School

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December 3 | Business & Government Seminar Series

International Climate Change Negotiations & Copenhagen

Robert N.Stavins
Albert Pratt Professor of Business & Government
Harvard Kennedy School
Director, Harvard Environmental Economics Program

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SPRING SEMESTER 2009 (2008/2009 SCHOOL YEAR)
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February 5

Business & Government Seminar Series
Bell Hall (5th floor, Belfer Building)
12:00-1:30 pm, Lunch provided: RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

'Capital' and 'Leverage' for Financial Institutions, with Lessons from the S&L Debacle for the Current Debacle
'Capital' and 'leverage' are terms that are used frequently in discussing the causes and solutions for the current financial debacle. Some simple accounting examples will illustrate these concepts and how they relate to the underlying problems of asymmetric information -- adverse selection and moral hazard -- that every lender (and financial regulator) faces. The experience of the S&L debacle of two decades ago will then be used to draw lessons for dealing with the current debacle.

Lawrence J. White
Arthur E. Imperatore Professor of Economics                                                                                               Professor White Discusses Financial
New York University Leonard N. Stern School of Business

                                                     Institutions at a February 09 Seminar

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February 12

Business & Government Seminar Series
Bell Hall (5th floor, Belfer Building)
12:00-1:30 pm, Lunch provided: RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

The Governance Failure and the Crisis of Capitalism
Although mistakes by regulators, rating agencies, consumers and the business media contributed, the primary cause of the financial melt-down was bad business decision making by boards of directors and business leaders. This melt-down has led to a crisis of capitalism where trust in business decision-making is lost, but the new balance between public controls and private self-determination is unclear. What happened? What can be done? Click here for related Bloomberg & Business Week articles by Ben Heineman.

Ben Heineman
Senior Distinguished Fellow, Program on the Legal Profession, Harvard Law School; &
Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

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February 18

The Geopolitics of Energy Seminar Series
Fainsod Room (Littauer 324)
10:30 am - 12:00 pm: for more information, email heprg@ksg.harvard.edu

These seminars look at the intersection of grand strategy and energy. How are major and middle powers assessing the energy landscape and anticipating their future energy needs? How are these assumptions shaping their foreign policies, their military policies, and their broader interactions with the world? To what extent are geopolitics influencing the page and character of the shift to alternative energy sources? This series brings distinguished speakers to Harvard to look at such questions primarily from country and regional perspectives. Their insights will provide us a basis, not only for understanding country actions, but also for identifying possible new nodes of international conflict and cooperation.

The Future of Oil and Gas
John Hess
Chairman and CEO, Hess Corporation

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February 19

New Directions in Regulation Seminar Series
Bell Hall (5th floor, Belfer Building)
12:00-1:30 pm, Lunch provided: RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

Railroads, Regulation, and Recession: the Role of the Surface Transportation Board
This seminar will discuss current trends in railroad traffic, rates and service; the changes in the political landscape and how they affect the potential for the passage of legislation affecting railroad regulation (including the anti-trust exemption bills); and recent developments at the Surface Transportation Board. Click here for the seminar handout.

Frank Mulvey
Vice Chairman,
Surface Transportation Board

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February 25

Brown Bag Lunch Seminar
Fainsod Room (Littauer 324)
Noon, RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

How the Wise Decide
At this brown bag event, Senior Fellow Bryn Zeckhauser will discuss her new book How the Wise Decide. How do the wise leaders make great decisions? Discover the formula used by twenty-one of the world's most extraordinary leaders to make consistent and smart decisions. Bryn Zeckhauser, a senior fellow with the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government has co-authored a book, (with Aaron Sandoski) "How the Wise Decide" (Crown Business). The authors went directly to the source. They spoke one on one with 15 CEOs, a supreme court justice, a prime minister, President Obama's top economic advisor, and others. What they uncovered was how public and private sector leaders make great decisions, sometimes in unusual ways.

Bryn Zeckhauser
Senior Fellow, Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government
Principal, Equity Resource Investments

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February 25

The Geopolitics of Energy Seminar Series
Fainsod Room (Littauer 324)
10:30 am - 12:00 pm: for more information, email heprg@ksg.harvard.edu

These seminars look at the intersection of grand strategy and energy. How are major and middle powers assessing the energy landscape and anticipating their future energy needs? How are these assumptions shaping their foreign policies, their military policies, and their broader interactions with the world? To what extent are geopolitics influencing the page and character of the shift to alternative energy sources? This series brings distinguished speakers to Harvard to look at such questions primarily from country and regional perspectives. Their insights will provide us a basis, not only for understanding country actions, but also for identifying possible new nodes of international conflict and cooperation.

Europe
Nick Butler
Chairman, Cambridge University Center for University Studies
Former VP for Strategy and Development for BP

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February 26

Business & Government Seminar Series
Allison Dining Room (5th floor, Taubman Building)
12:00-1:30 pm, Lunch provided: RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

CSR is here to stay
Critiques of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) have questioned whether it is feasible for a business to really “Do Well by Doing Good.” Empirical evidence to back up the double bottom line claim seems ambiguous. Activists on the other side of the argument too, have been skeptical of the “Doing Good” claim, dismissing it as “Green Washing.” Yet more and more companies are engaged in CSR today than ever. So what is really going on, and what is the future of CSR as a business discipline?

V. Kasturi Rangan
Malcolm P. McNair Professor of Marketing
Harvard Business School

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February 26

Special Event, Co-Sponsored by M-RCBG and the Belfer Center for Science & International Affairs
Allison Dining Room (5th floor, Taubman Building)
2:00-3:30 pm: RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

The Icelandic Economy: Recovery for the First Victim of the Financial Crisis

Dr. Gylfi Magnusson

Minister of Business Affairs, Iceland

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March 4

The Geopolitics of Energy Seminar Series
Land Hall (4th floor Belfer Building)
10:30 am - 12:00 pm: for more information, email heprg@ksg.harvard.edu

These seminars look at the intersection of grand strategy and energy. How are major and middle powers assessing the energy landscape and anticipating their future energy needs? How are these assumptions shaping their foreign policies, their military policies, and their broader interactions with the world? To what extent are geopolitics influencing the page and character of the shift to alternative energy sources? This series brings distinguished speakers to Harvard to look at such questions primarily from country and regional perspectives. Their insights will provide us a basis, not only for understanding country actions, but also for identifying possible new nodes of international conflict and cooperation.

China
Erica Downs
China Energy Fellow, The Brookings Institution

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March 5

New Directions in Regulation Seminar Series
Bell Hall (5th floor, Belfer Building)
12:00-1:30 pm, Lunch provided: RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

Legal and economic issues in litigation arising from the credit crisis

This seminar explores the economic and legal causes and consequences of the 2007-2008 credit crisis, whether the difficulties might have been foreseen, and some of the main legal issues that will play an important role in the extensive litigation that is underway. The seminar also discusses three principles that will likely prove central in the resolution of the securities class-action litigation: (1) "no fraud by hindsight"; (2) "truth on the market"; and (3) "loss causation." The background paper can be downloaded here.

Allen Ferrell
Professor of Law
Harvard Law School

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March 11

The Geopolitics of Energy Seminar Series
Land Hall (4th floor Belfer Building)
10:30 am - 12:00 pm: for more information, email heprg@ksg.harvard.edu

These seminars look at the intersection of grand strategy and energy. How are major and middle powers assessing the energy landscape and anticipating their future energy needs? How are these assumptions shaping their foreign policies, their military policies, and their broader interactions with the world? To what extent are geopolitics influencing the page and character of the shift to alternative energy sources? This series brings distinguished speakers to Harvard to look at such questions primarily from country and regional perspectives. Their insights will provide us a basis, not only for understanding country actions, but also for identifying possible new nodes of international conflict and cooperation.

The United States
Amy Myers Jaffee
Wilson Fellow in Energy Studies at the Baker Institute for Public Policy, Rice University

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March 12

Business & Government Seminar Series
Bell Hall (5th floor, Belfer Building)
12:00-1:30 pm, Lunch provided: RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

The Persistent Elusiveness of Accountable Global Governance
The devastating worldwide effects of the financial crisis make it clear that economic calamity is no more confined by national borders than health epidemics, environmental disasters, or criminal trafficking. Despite this realization, efforts to create global regimes to address such transnational ills have been frustrated by the seeming inability of interested parties to construct workable global institutions. And, to make matters worse, the organizations which have been effective are congenitally plagued by charges of undemocraticness and lack of accountability. This talk, based on a forthcoming book World Rule: The Politics of Global Governance (University of Chicago Press, under contract), offers the novel argument the failures of accountability are a function of the very compromises necessary to build meaningful global regimes. Based on an empirical study of twenty-five global rulemaking organizations, this conclusion applies to a wide variety of institutions, including both intergovernmental and non-governmental bodies. From an in-depth analysis of the structure and processes adopted by global governance organizations, lessons are taken regarding the mechanisms for balancing the pragmatic demands of maintaining authority with the expectations of normative legitimacy.
Click here for a pdf of the slides used in Jonathan Koppell's presentation.

Jonathan Koppell
Associate Professor of Politics and Management, &
Director of the Millstein Center for Corporate Governance and Performance
Yale School of Management

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March 18

The Geopolitics of Energy Seminar Series
Land Hall (4th floor Belfer Building)
10:30 am - 12:00 pm: for more information, email heprg@ksg.harvard.edu

These seminars look at the intersection of grand strategy and energy. How are major and middle powers assessing the energy landscape and anticipating their future energy needs? How are these assumptions shaping their foreign policies, their military policies, and their broader interactions with the world? To what extent are geopolitics influencing the page and character of the shift to alternative energy sources? This series brings distinguished speakers to Harvard to look at such questions primarily from country and regional perspectives. Their insights will provide us a basis, not only for understanding country actions, but also for identifying possible new nodes of international conflict and cooperation.

Russia
Fiona Hill
National Intelligence Officer for Russia and Eurasia, National Intelligence Council

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March 19

New Directions in Regulation Seminar Series
Bell Hall (5th floor, Belfer Building)
12:00-1:30 pm, Lunch provided: RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

Making Sense of the Subprime Crisis
Paul Willen, senior economist of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, will discuss two recent papers. The first, Making Sense of the Subprime Crisis, explores the question of whether market participants could have or should have anticipated the large increase in foreclosures that occurred in 2007 and 2008. The second, Subprime Mortgages, Foreclosures, and Urban Neighborhoods, analyzes the impact of the subprime crisis on urban neighborhoods in Massachusetts.

Click here for the slides from Paul Willen's presentation.

Paul Willen
Senior Economist and Policy Advisor
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

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March 20

Business & Government Seminar
Fainsod (Littauer Building, Room 324)
12:00-1:30 pm, Lunch provided: RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

Ponzi Schemes: Why Madoff will not be the last
Who was the namesake for financial scams? What can we learn from Ponzi and the dozens of con artists that followed him? Please join MR-CBG Senior Fellow Mark Fagan for a description of the character traits and behavior of con artists and their “investors” as well as the architecture and life cycle of their schemes. We will discuss strategies for preventing, or at least mitigating, the risk of future schemes.

Mark Fagan
Senior Fellow, Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government

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March 30

Special Event, Co-Sponsored by Taubman Center for State and Local Government, the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, and M-RCBG
Nye AB (5th floor, Taubman Building)
6:00 pm

Making Hard Choices in Troubling Times: How Massachusetts is Addressing its Fiscal Crisis
Because the deep and unprecedented national recession, Massachusetts has had to close an approximately $6 billion gap beween available revenues and projected spending for the current and upcoming fiscal year. This task is especially difficult because the economic downturn forces many individuals and families to rely more than ever on the safety net provided by state programs. Moreover, the economic uncertainty that characterizes the current financial downturn makes it especially hard to accurately project how much money will be available to address these pressing needs.

Leslie Kirwan
Massachusetts Secretary of Administration and Finance

Commentary by State Representative Charles Murphy, Chair of the House Ways and Means Committee and
Peter Zimmerman, Senior Associate Dean and Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

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April 1

The Geopolitics of Energy Seminar Series
Land Hall (4th floor Belfer Building)
10:30 am - 12:00 pm: for more information, email heprg@ksg.harvard.edu

These seminars look at the intersection of grand strategy and energy. How are major and middle powers assessing the energy landscape and anticipating their future energy needs? How are these assumptions shaping their foreign policies, their military policies, and their broader interactions with the world? To what extent are geopolitics influencing the page and character of the shift to alternative energy sources? This series brings distinguished speakers to Harvard to look at such questions primarily from country and regional perspectives. Their insights will provide us a basis, not only for understanding country actions, but also for identifying possible new nodes of international conflict and cooperation.

India
Varun Rai
Research Fellow, Stanford University

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April 2

Business & Government Special Presentation
Fainsod (Littauer Building, Room 324)
8:30-10:00 am; RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

The impact of the financial crisis on the business-government relationship

David Rubenstein
Co-Founder and Managing Director of the Carlyle Group;
Former Deputy Assistant to President Carter for Domestic Policy;
Member of the Visiting Committee of the Harvard Kennedy School

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April 2

Business & Government Seminar Series
Bell Hall (5th floor, Belfer Building)
12:00-1:30 pm, Lunch provided: RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

Maximizing State Assets during a Fiscal Crisis
How does a financial crisis affect how a State seeks to maximize the financial and operational performance of its assets using the techniques of public-private partnerships (PPP)? New York State is the world’s twelfth largest economy, and is at the epicenter of the US financial crisis. Its major institutions, both public and private, are confronting a fiscal and social crisis. The State is rich in assets but does not have the structure, authority or resources to configure its assets in ways that could help address its problems. This seminar will explore how the New York State Commission on Asset Maximization has approached its mission and how its plans for the future may offer solutions for New York and other major states.

Alan Trager
Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School;
Commissioner, New York State Commission on Asset Maximization

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April 7

Business & Government Seminar Series
Bell Hall (5th floor, Belfer Building)
12:00-1:30 pm, Lunch provided: RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

The Panic of '08 - What Happened? What's Next?
A veteran technology investor, Glenn Hutchins argues that the failure of Lehman Brothers was the catalytic event that caused "The Panic of '08" and converted a garden-variety recession into a full-blown crisis.  He traces the root causes of the crisis to establish that everyone played a role --mortgage lenders, home-owners, bankers and consumers, chief executives and politicians, the mighty Fed and the lowly rating agencies. He explores the implications of the crisis for the US economy and for the US role in the world.  Looking ahead, Hutchins argues that entrepreneurship and advances in technology will help lead us out of our current problems.

Glenn Hutchins
Co-Founder and Co-Chief Executive of Silver Lake;
Board of Directors, Nasdaq;
Harvard Management Company, Director

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April 9

New Directions in Regulation Seminar Series
Bell Hall (5th floor, Belfer Building)
12:00-1:30 pm, Lunch provided: RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

The Financial Crisis: How Did We Get Here and How Will Regulation Change?
The U.S. is in the middle of the worst financial crisis since the 1930s.  Congress undoubtedly will, and should, restructure financial regulation in dramatic ways.  But it is important that this restructuring proceed from a good understanding of what are the purposes of financial regulation and where the current regulatory structure failed.

Robert Glauber
Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
Visiting Professor, Harvard Law School

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April 22

The Geopolitics of Energy Seminar Series
Land Hall (4th floor Belfer Building)
10:30 am - 12:00 pm: for more information, email heprg@ksg.harvard.edu

These seminars look at the intersection of grand strategy and energy. How are major and middle powers assessing the energy landscape and anticipating their future energy needs? How are these assumptions shaping their foreign policies, their military policies, and their broader interactions with the world? To what extent are geopolitics influencing the page and character of the shift to alternative energy sources? This series brings distinguished speakers to Harvard to look at such questions primarily from country and regional perspectives. Their insights will provide us a basis, not only for understanding country actions, but also for identifying possible new nodes of international conflict and cooperation.

Energy, Markets and Geopolitics
Tom Fingar
Payne Distinguished Lecturer, Stanford University
Former Chairman of the National Intelligence Council

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April 22

Business & Government Seminar
Fainsod (Littauer Building, Room 324)
12:00-1:30 pm, Lunch provided: RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

Financial Bubbles: Letting the Air Out Before they Burst
The recent implosion of the stock and real estate markets has raised questions about the origin and management of financial/asset bubbles. Financial bubbles are not new. From tulips to stocks to real estate, asset bubbles have grown and burst for centuries. Why have we not learned from our past? Are future bubbles inevitable? Please join a discussion of the nature of financial bubbles and an exploration of two unlikely possible solutions – operations management and the power of the individual.

Mark Fagan
Senior Fellow, Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government

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April 23

Business & Government Seminar Series
Bell Hall (5th floor, Belfer Building)
12:00-1:30 pm, Lunch provided: RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

The Shape of Financial Re-Regulation
There is more agreement that too little regulation helped contribute to the financial crisis than consensus about what kind of regulation is needed in the future. We do not need an industrial policy that substitutes for the invisible hand, nationalization, or a new ocean of paperwork. We need instead prohibitions on activities by essential institutions that have plainly proven harmful. The needed rules include: tight restrictions on leverage of all sorts, limitations on the use of overly complex derivatives and similar instruments, assurances of cyclical robustness that can not be undermined by short-sighted compensation policies, prohibitions of predatory sales practices in financial products, a tightening of disclosure and transparency standards, and, probably, outright limits on scale in financial institutions. Had a common-sense set of limitations been in place all along, our economy would have manageably absorbed a real estate downturn and millions of American families would have been spared harm. Click here for related Boston Globe opinion piece by James M. Stone.

James M. Stone
CEO, Plymouth Rock group of property and casualty insurance companies
Former Chairman, Commodity Futures Trading Commission

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April 28

Business & Government Breakfast Seminar
Allison Dining Room (5th floor, Taubman Building)
8:30-10:00 am, RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

How to Manage Risk when the Government is Now your Shareholder
With the economy in steep decline and the financial sector experiencing record losses, risk management in major financial institutions has taken on significant new dimensions. TARP funding that many institutions have accepted has made government a shareholder as well as a stakeholder. Public and media interest is at an all time high as the Obama Administration and Congress grapple with the labyrinth of issues and consider new or re-regulation of financial entities. Risk managers are adding to their ranks, and are in much more frequent dialogue with government about present challenges and future directions.

Regina Sullivan
Head of Country Risk and Transition Risk at Bank of America

Jacques Longerstaey
Chief Risk Officer of State Street Global Advisors

Moderated by Tom Healey, Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School and Director, Goldman Sachs & Co.

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April 28

Business & Government Seminar Series
This special seminar is co-sponsored together with the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston.
Taubman 275 (2nd floor, Taubman Building)
2:30-4:00 pm, RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

The People Factor: Strengthening America by Investing in Public Service
Successful businesses have spent the past two decades retooling and rethinking how to manage their people better. Most big companies that have survived and prospered in the 21st century view employees as a vital strategic asset. In comparison, the U.S. federal government is a Stone Age relic, with its top-down bureaucracy, stovepiping of labor and responsibilities, and lack of training and investment in its own public servants. The inevitable result is a government not keeping up with the complex demands placed on it. In The People Factor, Linda Bilmes and Scott Gould present a blueprint for reinvigorating the public sector in order to deliver results for America. Their premise is that the federal government can achieve the same gainsas the best private sector and military organizations by managing its people better. Their new vision for public service is based on The People Factor, a set of management tools drawn from best practices in successful companies, the military, and high-performing government agencies. Part One of The People Factor book shows why the U.S. personnel system needs reform, revealing the high price of inaction. Part Two lays out the specific steps that must be taken to achieve the necessary gains. Part Three focuses on how to implement the People Factor and make the authors vision a reality. They argue that the next president needs to turn this issue into a top priority and use political capital to push reform. Highlights of the book include: Extensive original survey research Case studies from government and the military Interviews with leading thinkers on strategic human capital A number of specific proposed innovations A detailed proposal for a nationwide effort to train and revitalize the public service.

Linda Bilmes

Lecturer in Public Policy
Harvard Kennedy School

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April 29

The Geopolitics of Energy Seminar Series
Land Hall (4th floor Belfer Building)
10:30 am - 12:00 pm: for more information, email heprg@ksg.harvard.edu

These seminars look at the intersection of grand strategy and energy. How are major and middle powers assessing the energy landscape and anticipating their future energy needs? How are these assumptions shaping their foreign policies, their military policies, and their broader interactions with the world? To what extent are geopolitics influencing the page and character of the shift to alternative energy sources? This series brings distinguished speakers to Harvard to look at such questions primarily from country and regional perspectives. Their insights will provide us a basis, not only for understanding country actions, but also for identifying possible new nodes of international conflict and cooperation.

Geopolitics of Energy: Looking Forward
Llewelyn Hughes
Research Fellow, Consortium for Energy Policy Research, Harvard Kennedy School

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April 30

Business & Government Seminar Series
Bell Hall (5th floor, Belfer Building)
12:00-1:30 pm, Lunch provided: RSVP to mrcbg@ksg.harvard.edu

The European Business Lobby
While there has been an extensive literature on the politics of business lobbying in the US context there have been fewer studies of the role of business in the EU policy process. Based on two surveys of Europe’s largest companies in 1997 and 2007 this presentation charts the rise of firm as a political actor in Brussels and explains the changing EU business lobbying logic. The presentation argues that a distinct ‘reputational’ based model of business lobbying has emerged that is unique to the EU political setting and has huge implications for the forthcoming EU transparency and regulation of lobbying debates.

David Coen
Professor of Public Policy and Deputy Head of the Department of Political Science in the School of Public Policy,
University College London

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BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS
Click on the name of each of the seminar speakers listed above for a link to their bio. Some links refer to other web pages; other links refer to the bios presented below.


Frank Mulvey
Frank Mulvey is the Vice Chairman of the Surface Transportation Board (Board). He was sworn in as the eighth Member of the Board on June 2, 2004. He was nominated to the Board by President George W. Bush on November 17, 2003, for a four-year term expiring on December 31, 2007. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on May 21, 2004. President Bush nominated Vice Chairman Mulvey to a second term of office on November 30, 2007. On December 19, 2007, the Senate confirmed the Vice Chairman's second term as a Member of the Board for a term of office ending December 31, 2012. At the time of his appointment to the Board, Vice Chairman Mulvey was Staff Director for Railroad Subcommittee and Staff Director for Pipelines and Hazardous Materials for the Subcommittee on Highways and Transit, House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. He was responsible for all railroad legislative matters for the Ranking Democratic Member of the Committee and served as advisor to the Ranking Member on overall transportation policy issues. Other positions held include Deputy Assistant Inspector General for Rail, Transit, and Special Programs, U.S. Dept. of Transportation, Office of the Inspector General; Assistant Director for Social Security and Pension Issues, U.S. General Accounting Office; Assistant Director for Competition, Economic, and Regulatory Analyses in the Transportation Issues Area, U.S. General Accounting Office; Director of Economic Research for the NY State Legislative Commission on Solid Waste Management; Programs Manager, National Academy of Sciences, Transportation Research Board; and Vice-President for Research, American Bus Association. In addition, he has served as an Adjunct Faculty member at the R.H. Smith School of Business and Public Administration, Univ. of Maryland. He has also taught economics and statistics at Northeastern University, Wheaton College, and Bowling Green State University. Vice Chairman Mulvey holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Washington State University (1974); a B.S. in Economics from New York University (1966); and an M.A. in Economics from the University of California at Berkeley (1968). Vice Chairman Mulvey and his wife, Petra, live in Maryland. They have one son, Conor, who resides in Washington, D.C.

 

James M. Stone
James M. Stone was born in New York City in 1947. He was educated in the public school system in Pelham, New York, and at Harvard University. A National Merit Scholar, Mr. Stone received his Bachelors degree from Harvard in 1969 with Highest Honors in Economics. He received prizes for the best undergraduate economics thesis and for the best research paper presented to the Graduate School in Economics and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Selected as a Graduate Prize Fellow in Economics, Mr. Stone received his Ph.D. in Economics in 1973 and was then appointed Lecturer in Economics by the Harvard Faculty, where he taught the economics of securities markets.

During his time at Harvard, Mr. Stone consulted for a Boston-based insurance brokerage firm. To facilitate his study of insurance, he qualified for the designation of Chartered Property Casualty Underwriter (CPCU) and completed six examinations for admission to the Casualty Actuarial Society. His 1973 paper on the insurance of catastrophic risk became a standard requirement of the CAS syllabus.

In February of 1975, Mr. Stone was appointed by Governor Michael S. Dukakis to serve as the Commissioner of Insurance for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The Commissioner of Insurance is statutorily charged with regulatory duties involving all aspects of the insurance business within the state. Mr. Stone served in that position for four years.

Mr. Stone was appointed Chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission by President Jimmy Carter in 1979. The CFTC is the federal agency vested with exclusive regulatory jurisdiction over futures trading activity in more than sixty commodities.

In 1983, Mr. Stone concluded his term in Washington and returned to Boston, where he founded The Plymouth Rock Company. He currently serves as the Chairman and CEO of Plymouth Rock family of companies, with aggregate automobile and homeowners premium writings in excess of one billion dollars annually. Mr. Stone is also the founder of Response Insurance, which writes automobile insurance nationally by direct marketing techniques, and Homesite Group Inc., which writes home insurance across the country. He serves as a member of the Administrative Committee of Lindsay Goldberg, a New York based private equity investment firm.

Mr. Stone is actively involved with a number of non-profit organizations, currently serving as a Member of the Board of Directors, and chairman of the Commercial Relations Committee, of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory; as a Member of the Board of Directors and Chairman of the Nominating and Governance Committee of Management Sciences for Health; and a member of the Compensation Committee of the United Way of Massachusetts Bay. He served as a member of the Board of Directors of The Boston Globe Newspaper Corporation from 1998 to 2006.

Mr. Stone is the author of a book on the securities industry and numerous articles on insurance, finance, and economics. He has served as an advisor to governments in three developing countries on the regulation of the insurance sector. Mr. Stone is married, with two children, and lives in Boston.