Consortium for Energy Policy Research at Harvard
FELLOWS AND VISITING SCHOLARS (2016-2017)

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A
Mauricio Arias
Giorgio Ruffolo Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program, Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Tradeoffs between hydropower and river alterations in the Amazon River Basin

Dr. Mauricio Arias’s work at Harvard is based at the Harvard’s Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology. His research aims at creating science-based linkages between the hydrological cycle, ecosystems, and society in order to promote sustainable management of water resources. He has studied physical, biological and chemical properties of freshwater ecosystems in Colombia, the United States, China, New Zealand, and most recently in Cambodia, where he carried out his doctoral research. Mauricio is investigating the effect of hydropower operations in river flows and how hydrological alterations through the Amazon basin could be mitigated while maintaining electricity generation needs. He is contributing to the Initiative on Sustainable Development of the Amazon and its Surrounding Regions: The Interplay of Changing Climate, Hydrology, and Land Use led by Paul Moorcroft. Mauricio holds a Bachelor of Science (Magna Cum Laude) and a Masters of Engineering in Environmental Engineering Sciences from the University of Florida. He recently completed a PhD in Civil Engineering from the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, where he was awarded UC’s International Doctoral Student Scholarship. Mauricio’s doctoral research focused on the Mekong River Basin, where he quantified the impacts of hydropower development and climate change on the hydrology and ecology of the Tonle Sap, Southeast Asia’s largest lake and one of the most productive freshwater fisheries on the planet. His faculty host is Paul Moorcroft.


Sarah Armitage
Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
Pre-doctoral Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD student in Political Economy and Government

Sarah’s research interests center around the economics of environmental regulation, energy economics, and industrial organization. She holds an M Phil in Economic and Social History from the University of Cambridge, where she was a Gates Cambridge Scholar, and a BA in history from Yale University. She previously worked as a consultant with the environmental consulting firm Industrial Economics, Inc. (IEc), and as a research assistant at MIT’s Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR).


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Megan Bailey
Pre-doctoral Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD student in Public Policy
Research Topic: Greenhouse gas policies

Megan Bailey seeks to evaluate the environmental efficacy and economic efficiency of policy options for curbing greenhouse gas emissions, such as carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems, at both national and international levels. Additionally, she is interested in the non-market valuation of ecosystem services, particularly those at risk of being lost via ecological collapse. Megan holds a BS in ecology, evolution, and organismal biology; a BA in art; and an MA in international relations from California State University, Fresno. She is the recipient of a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.


Anca Balietti
Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Evidence for Policy Design (EPoD)

Anca Balietti is a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at Evidence for Policy Design (EPoD) at the Harvard Kennedy School. Anca graduated with a Master’s of Science in Financial Engineering and Risk Management at HEC Lausanne, Switzerland. She then obtained her PhD from the University of Zurich, where her research focused on the economics of climate change mitigation. Her research interests are environmental and resource economics, market failures, real options, and health and development economics. Anca is currently working on several projects focused on the impact of environmental policy interventions on the health and wealth levels of individuals in India, Bangladesh, and Peru.


Patrick Behrer
Pre-doctoral Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD student in Public Policy

Patrick Behrer holds an AB in economics from Harvard University and a MS in resource economics from Colorado State University. While an undergraduate at Harvard, Patrick won the Harvard Environmental Economics Program's 2010 James M. and Cathleen D. Stone Prize for the Best Senior Thesis. He also spent a year in New Zealand as a Fulbright Fellow studying environmental policy. His research interests lie in the valuation of ecosystem services and the institutional or programmatic design necessary to fully integrate the value of these services into a modern economy. Additionally, he is interested in land use policy and creative mechanisms for financing conservation projects, particularly in developing countries.


Jonathan Buonocore
Program Leader, Climate, Energy, and Health, Center for Health and the Global Environment
Research topic: Evaluating the impacts, benefits, and tradeoffs of technology and policy choices in energy, transportation, agricultural practices, and climate change mitigation and adaptation.

Presently, Jonathan is working with the Climate, Energy, and Health team to better understand the health and environmental risks of hydraulic fracturing in Pennsylvania’s Marcellus Shale, and also researching the health and climate benefits of renewable energy, energy efficiency, and other carbon mitigation methods. By exploring the tradeoffs between different technologies, methods of pollution control, and policy options, Jonathan and the team will develop research-based recommendations designed to help policymakers, investors, leaders of industry, and residents of affected areas make informed decisions that will support public health and a healthy environment. Jonathan is also working with Center faculty to estimate the health impacts of particulate exposure due to fires in Indonesia, including particulate matter that crosses international boundaries.


Lizzie Burns
Research Fellow, Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Research Topic: Geoengineering

Lizzie Burns is a Research Fellow at Harvard, where she works for Professor David Keith on issues related to geoengineering. Lizzie is passionate about working on issues of climate change, and previously spent a summer interning for the White House Council on Environmental Quality. She also previously worked for the nonprofit organization, Opportunity Nation. Lizzie earned a Master in Public Policy degree from the Harvard Kennedy School and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Williams College.

 

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Daniel Edward Callies
Predoctoral Research Fellow, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program
Research Topic: The ethics, legitimacy, and justice of solar radiation management

Daniel Callies is a predoctoral research fellow in the Belfer Center's Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, a PhD candidate in political science at Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, a predoctoral researcher at Goethe University's Cluster of Excellence "Normative Orders," and a research associate at the Agenda for International Development. His dissertation addresses moral and political concerns surrounding climate engineering. He studied philosophy at San Diego State University where he was awarded his BA in 2008 and his MA in 2012. His research focuses on normative and applied ethics, global justice, and climate justice.

Rohit Chandra
Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD Student in Public Policy
Research Topic: State capitalism in the Indian coal industry: 1960-2005

Rohit Chandra's research focuses on the history, evolution, and dynamics of energy markets in India. In particular, he looks at the multiple roles of the state as owner, regulator, consumer, and planner. His dissertation focuses in particular on the Indian coal industry, constructing a state capitalism framed history of the industry from 1960-2005. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a degree in electrical engineering and has worked at the Centre for Policy Research in New Delhi and the Center for Advanced Study of India in Philadelphia.


Cuicui Chen
Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD Candidate in Public Policy
Research Topic: Industrial organizations, environmental economics, microeconomic theory 

Cuicui Chen is interested in firms’ behavior under market-based regulations. In her dissertation she is investigating how electric generating companies have learned over time to comply with (or better yet, take advantage of) the Acid Rain Program, the first large-scale market-based environmental regulation in U.S., and how that learning process might have been affected by Public Utilities Commissions' regulation and deregulation. Cuicui is also using insights from microeconomic theory in the study of international climate agreements. She graduated from Tsinghua University in 2010 with a Bachelor's degree in Environmental Engineering, and from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2012 with a Master of Science degree in Technology and Policy.

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Marinella Davide
Giorgio Ruffolo Research Fellow in Sustainability Science/Environment and Natural Resources Program
Research Topic: EU climate change policy, international climate negotiations, energy poverty

Marinella Davide is a predoctoral research fellow on topics related to EU climate and energy policy and international negotiations. She is a PhD candidate in Climate Change Management at the Ca’Foscari University of Venice, where she investigates the linkages between climate change, poverty reduction and sustainable development. Her current research focuses on the impacts of the contributions undertaken under the recently-adopted Paris Agreement (the so-called INDCs) on poverty and inequality. Since 2010, she has been a researcher at the Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei and the Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change, where she works on a range of topics related to the UNFCCC negotiations, the national climate and energy policy in major countries, the EU ETS and the energy poverty in the EU.


John DeVillars
Senior Fellow, Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government
Research Topic: Getting Ahead of the Mob and Calling It a Parade: Electric Utility Leadership for a Clean Energy Economy

John DeVillars is a clean energy and environmental professional with substantial leadership experience in both the public and private sectors. He is currently Chairman of BlueWave Capital LLC, a solar energy development and investment firm with $200M in utility-scale assets in North America, the Caribbean, and South Africa and a residential solar loan program offered in selected markets in the United States. Mr. DeVillars has held several executive positions in the public sector including New England Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Massachusetts Secretary of Environmental Affairs, Chief of Operations to the Governor of Massachusetts, and Chairman of the Board of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority. At E.P.A. Mr. DeVillars launched a number of nationally-recognized initiatives including the establishment of the nation’s first regional Center for Environmental Industry and Technology; the Urban Environment Initiative which targeted EPA resources to address inner city health and environmental challenges; and the Clean Charles Initiative, a multi-stakeholder effort which has led to the Charles River reaching swimmable water quality standards. As the Commonwealth’s Environmental Secretary, he directed 3,500 employees and the $400 MM operating and capital budgets of five regulatory and natural resource agencies and pioneered advances in pollution prevention, air quality, wildlife protection, and market-‐based approaches to financing and regulating environmental activities. As Chairman of the MWRA Board of Directors, Mr. DeVillars was deeply involved in the six-‐billion-‐dollar cleanup of Boston Harbor, at the time the largest public works project in New England’s history. Mr. DeVillars has won numerous awards for his public service including the Nature Conservancy’s President’s Award for national environmental leadership. He serves as a member of the Board of Directors of several private companies and non-profit organizations including the E.P.A.’s National Advisory Council on Environmental Policy and Technology. Mr. DeVillars is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania (B.A.) and Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government (M.P.A.) As a senior fellow at the Center, he is focused on the role of public utilities in meeting the climate change challenge. His faculty sponsor is Professor William Hogan, Raymond Plank Professor of Global Energy Policy and the Harvard Electricity Policy Group (HEPG) Research Director.

E
Sebastian D. Eastham
NOAA Climate and Global Change Fellow, 2015-2017

Sebastian David Eastham is an environmental scientist interested in the transport and impacts of pollutants and trace species over long distances through the atmosphere.
Sebastian received an MEng in aerospace and aerothermal engineering from Cambridge University in 2011, with a dissertation on nuclear fuel cycle optimization. Between 2011 and 2015 he studied at MIT's Laboratory for Aviation and the Environment, working on a PhD in aeronautics and astronautics dedicated to the human health impacts of high altitude emissions. This work included integration of stratospheric chemistry and physics into the Harvard GEOS-Chem atmospheric model, development of a health impacts model and assessment of the long-term surface air quality and UV radiation impacts of both aviation and proposed sulfate aerosol geoengineering techniques. He received his PhD from the MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics in 2015.
Sebastian will be working with Daniel Jacob in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences to investigate the failure of Eulerian atmospheric models to reproduce observed synoptic-scale transport of pollution in narrow plumes and quasi-horizontal layers. Although a typical response to low model fidelity has been to increase global grid resolution and thereby incur significant computational cost, Sebastian is exploring the theoretical causes for enhanced numerical dissipation in these atmospheric structures. The goal of this research is to identify new and efficient modeling techniques capable of accurately reproducing and maintaining the observed high chemical gradients over global distances without requiring prohibitively fine global grid resolutions. By enabling accurate representation of long-distance pollutant transport and chemistry, Sebastian hopes to improve model accuracy with regards to intercontinental impact attribution.

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Fabio Farinosi
Giorgio Ruffolo Doctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program, Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Vulnerability of hydropower generation to changes in climate, hydrology and land use in Brazil
Fabio Farinosi’s fellowship research is based at the Harvard’s Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology. He is a doctoral student in the Science and Management of Climate Change Programme at Ca’ Foscari University in Italy. His research assesses the impacts of global changes in climate, combined with regional changes in land use and hydrology in the Amazon, on flood risk and hydropower generation in Brazil. The project aims to provide policy makers with a better understanding of the expected future impacts and enhance long-term mitigation strategies. Fabio is contributing to the collaborative Initiative on Sustainable Development of the Amazon and its Surrounding Regions: The Interplay of Changing Climate, Hydrology, and Land Use, led by Professor Paul Moorcroft.


Orit Farkash-Hacohen
Visiting Fellow, Harvard Electricity Policy Group
Orit Farkash-Hacohen is a visiting fellow with the Harvard's Electricity Policy Group (HEPG) at the Harvard Kennedy School. Prior to her appointment, Orit served as Chair of the Israeli Electricity Authority (PUA) between 2011 and 2016 and was the first woman to be appointed to this position. In her capacity as the PUA's chair Farkash-Hacohen was the spearhead of the Israeli government's resolution to introduce private players into the electricity market. Following 80 years of a complete monopoly in the electricity market, Orit led a historic change, bringing in private power producers in significant numbers (40%). The PUA set up and enforced regulations to support investment, forcing the introduction of private power producers into the market. Farkash-Hacohen was also instrumental in cultivating the private solar industry and opposed natural gas contracts negotiated under effectively monopoly conditions. She led the PUA during the biggest gas shortage Israel had ever known in 2011-2013 and pushed forward energy efficiency arrangements and a better resource allocation between the market players. Prior to this position Farkash-Hacohen served as the Chief Legal Advisor to the Authority (2003-2011). Before that, since 1998, she was a leading litigator at the Israeli Antitrust Authority, handling antitrust law violations and implementations. Previously, she was an attorney in one of Israel's prominent law firms. Farkash-Hacohen holds an MPA from Harvard's Kennedy School (2007) and an LLB from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Her professional internship took place at the Israel Supreme Court in Jerusalem, where she clerked for Justice Dorner.
Under the guidance of Prof. Bill Hogan and Prof. Ashley Brown, Orit is writing a paper reflecting her unique professional experience in her last position as the Israeli PUA Chair in introducing private players into poorly structured and monopolistic electricity and gas markets. The paper elaborates the inefficiencies borne by the public as a result of the gas supply monopoly and looks for institutional lessons regarding the proper role and authority of independent and professional regulatory bodies. 


Nathan Fleming
Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD student in Public Policy
Research Topic: Understanding how access to natural resources affects national security and potentially drives conflict
Nathan Fleming is interested in natural resource economics and security studies. Specifically, he is interested in understanding how access to natural resources affects national security and potentially drives conflict. He also has a related interest in manufacturing firm strategies for securing critical materials. He began his career as a mechanical engineer. He designed aircraft engines at General Electric for five years before returning to school to earn SM degrees in mechanical engineering and Technology & Policy at MIT.

 

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Todd Gerarden
Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD student in Public Policy
Research Topic: Renewable energy investment incentives and energy efficiency

Todd's interests lie at the intersection of energy and environmental economics, public economics, and industrial organization. His current research focuses on energy efficiency and government incentives for renewable energy investment. Todd obtained a BS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Virginia in 2010. He is a recipient of the EPA STAR Fellowship and a Truman Scholar. Before beginning doctoral studies, Todd worked at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and Resources for the Future.


Gianfranco Gianfrate
Giorgio Ruffolo Research Fellow in Sustainability Science, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Innovation financing, carbon finance, and the integration of environmental footprint metrics in corporate valuation

Gianfranco Gianfrate writes and researches on topics related to innovation financing, carbon finance, and the integration of environmental footprint metrics in corporate valuation.
Prior to joining the Belfer Center, Gianfranco was an Assistant Professor of Finance at Bocconi University (Milan, Italy) and a manager at Hermes Investment Management (London, UK). Gianfranco is a research affiliate of the Aspen Institute and of SovereigNET at Tufts Fletcher School. He holds a PhD in Business Administration from Bocconi University.


Anna P. Goldstein
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Movement of clean energy technology from the lab to the marketplace

Anna Goldstein’s research at the Belfer Center focuses on ways that governments, universities, and corporations can accelerate the movement of clean energy technology from the lab to the marketplace.
Anna received her PhD in 2014 in Chemistry with an emphasis in Nanoscale Science and Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, where she investigated nanomaterials for use in energy applications, such as artificial photosynthesis and electrochemical energy storage.


Yue Guo
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Project on Managing the Atom, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: The social acceptance of new energy technology innovation

Yue Guo is a postdoctoral research fellow with the Project on Managing the Atom. He received his PhD degree in Public Management from Tsinghua University, China, in July 2015.
His research mainly focuses on the social acceptance of new energy technology innovation. In his dissertation, he analyzed the factors influencing the public acceptance of nuclear power technology and the roles of government policies and public participation. He previously conducted research on local acceptance of wind power in China with Harvard Kennedy School Assistant Professor Laura Diaz Anadon, Former Science, Technology, and Public Policy Fellow Jun Su, and Former Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group Fellow Peng Ru.

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Olli Heinonen
Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Olli Heinonen’s research and teachings include nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament, verification of treaty compliance, enhancement of the verification work of international organizations, and transfer and control of peaceful uses of nuclear energy.
Before joining the Belfer Center in September 2010, Olli Heinonen served 27 years at the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna. Heinonen was the Deputy Director General of the IAEA, and head of its Department of Safeguards. Prior to that, he was Director at the Agency’s various Operational Divisions, and, as inspector, including at the IAEA’s overseas office in Tokyo, Japan, Heinonen led teams of international investigators to examine nuclear programmes of concern around the world and inspected nuclear facilities in South Africa, Iraq, North Korea, Syria, Libya and elsewhere, seeking to ensure that nuclear materials were not diverted for military purposes. He also spearheaded efforts to implement an analytical culture to guide and complement traditional verification activities. He led the Agency’s efforts to identify and dismantle nuclear proliferation networks, including the one led by Pakistani scientist A.Q. Khan, and he oversaw its efforts to monitor and contain Iran’s nuclear programme.

Prior to joining IAEA, he was a Senior Research Officer at the Technical Research Centre of Finland Reactor Laboratory in charge of research and development related to nuclear waste solidification and disposal. He is co-author of several patents on radioactive waste solidification.

Heinonen is the author of several articles, chapters of books, books, in publications ranging from the IAEA and nuclear non-proliferation issues, to regional nuclear developments. His writings and interviews have be published in various newspapers and magazines including: Foreign Policy, The Wall Street Journal, the Guardian, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Arms Control Today, Der Spiegel, Le Monde, the Helsingin Sanomat, the New York Times, the Mehr news, Die Stern, the Haaretz, the New Statesman, the Washington Post, the BBC, and Time. His policy briefings have been published by the Belfer Center, the Atlantic Council, the Nautilus Institute, the Institute for Science and International Security, the Nonproliferation Policy Education Center,  the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, and the Carnegie Endowment.

Olli Heinonen studied radiochemistry and completed his PhD dissertation in nuclear material analysis at the University of Helsinki.


Evan Herrnstadt
Kernan Brothers Environmental Fellow, 2015-2017

Evan Herrnstadt is an economist interested in the design and performance of energy and natural resource markets.

Evan earned a BS in economics and political science from the University of Iowa in 2006.  After graduating, he was a research assistant at Resources for the Future in Washington, DC, where he worked on energy and climate policy.  He moved to the University of Michigan in 2009, where he earned a MA in economics in 2011, and a PhD in economics in 2015.  His doctoral research primarily focused on modeling and estimating the effects of environmental requirements on how firms compete for government contracts.

As an Environmental Fellow, Evan will work with Ariel Pakes of the Department of Economics on the implications of common contracting practices in the oil and natural gas drilling industry.  He will also develop improved empirical tools for the analysis of data from natural resource auctions.  These insights and tools will improve our understanding of important institutions governing energy production, and help to predict the response of the energy industry to climate and environmental policies.


Mun Ho
Visiting Scholar, Harvard China Project, SEAS
Visiting Scholar, Institute for Quantitative Social Science
Research Topic: Economic effects of environmental policies in the U.S. and China

Mun Ho is an economist in the Harvard China Project’s integrated research of the environmental, health and economic impacts of emission control options in China. He has a PhD in economics from Harvard University and is also a visiting scholar at Resources for the Future in Washington, DC. He and others at the China Project have developed an economic growth model of China to study the impact of environmental policies and carbon taxes, and studied household energy demand patterns. He also works with Dale Jorgenson of the Economics Department in studying the distributional impacts of carbon policies in the U.S.

 

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Stuart Iler
HEEP Pre-Doctoral Fellow
PhD student in Public Policy

Stuart is interested in environmental and energy economics and policy, and in particular the design and evaluation of policies to promote renewable energy and energy efficiency. His previous research includes the impact of climate regulation in the electric power sector, potential reform of the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard, and comparative evaluation of global energy modeling projections. Stuart has worked as a research analyst at the Duke University Energy Initiative and as a policy analyst at the DC think tank, Bipartisan Policy Center. He also has a variety of experience in the information technology industry. Stuart graduated with a BS in Computer Science from the University of California at San Diego, and earned a Master of Environmental Management from Duke University.


Andrea Innamorati
Research Fellow, Environment and Natural Resources Program

Andrea Innamorati is a Senior Policy Advisor for the Italian Ministry of Environment. He represented Italy in numerous intergovernmental processes, including the intergovernmental negotiations on the 2030 Agenda.
Andrea has a Master's-level education in Sociology from the University "La Sapienza" in Rome, where he researched consumption patterns and mass communication and their impact on the future of our planet. His research will focus on the 2030 Agenda and on how the sustainable development goals will be integrated into existing policy tools and strategic frameworks at the EU level.

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Mehul Jain
Center for Public Leadership Fellow, Harvard Kennedy School

Mehul Jain is a graduate of the Environmental Engineering Program from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Over the past four years of his career he has worked on issues of policy, governance, environment, education and development with the World Bank, particularly focusing his attention to the National Ganga River Basin Clean-up project in India. Leveraging his experience in the development sector, Mehul has also advised politicians from Haryana, Rajasthan, Bihar and Uttar Pradesh. Making development the centerpiece of election campaigns he has been able to provide strategic insight to the associated political parties. These engagements have also allowed him to advise and run effective social media campaigns for the parties. A couple of these campaigns have been lauded as the most successful election campaigns in India. In the past, Mehul has also consulted for organizations such as CSE, TERI, PATH and UNICEF. He is currently pursuing the MPA/ID program at the Kennedy School.

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Ajinkya Shrish Kamat
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Science Technology and Public Policy Program/Innovation and Policy Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Ajinkya Kamat is a postdoctoral research fellow in the Belfer Center's Science Technology and Public Policy Program's Technology & Innovation project. His research interests include policy issues related to higher education and research institutions, industrial R&D, startups and linkages among different players in a technology innovation ecosystem, with main focus on India and China. Ajinkya is currently investigating how R&D centers set up in India by foreign multinational companies (MNCs) influence capabilities across India's technology innovation ecosystem and in what ways policy could contribute positively in this area.
He earned his PhD in physics from the University of Virginia in May 2015. Ajinkya also holds an MSc in physics from Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India and a BSc in physics from the University of Mumbai, India, where he secured the top rank at the university.


Melissa Kemp
National Science Foundation Environmental Fellow, 2015-2017

Melissa Kemp is an evolutionary biologist who uses the fossil record and historical data to investigate species responses to global change phenomena.
Melissa earned her BA in biology from Williams College in 2010 and her PhD in biology from Stanford University in 2015. At Williams, she studied the phytogeography of Indo-Pacific clownfish and the population genetics of chorus frogs. Her doctoral dissertation assessed the impact of environmental perturbations on the ecology and evolution of Caribbean lizards at three scales: (1) the regional scale, by evaluating and modeling extinction processes; (2) the community scale, by elucidating the interplay of species richness and species abundance over time; and (3) the species-scale, by assessing genetic responses to biotic and abiotic perturbations.
As an Environmental Fellow, Melissa will work with Jonathan Losos of the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology to investigate how past global change forces have altered species distributions in Anolis lizards. This will reveal population trajectories before, during, and after environmental perturbations are encountered, and provide a framework for evaluating future range shifts.


Shefali Khanna
HEEP Pre-Doctoral Fellow
PhD student in Public Policy

Shefali’s interests lie at the intersection of environmental policy and energy sector development in emerging economies, specifically on the role of renewable energy and energy efficiency incentives in expanding energy access and improving reliability. She graduated from the University of Maryland, College Park, with a BA in Economics and spent two years working as a research assistant at Resources for the Future, where her research focused on residential energy efficiency and vehicle fuel economy standards in the U.S. She also assisted the World Bank in updating its protocol for estimating global health damages from ambient air pollution.

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Jing Li
HEEP Pre-Doctoral Fellow
PhD student in Economics

Jing's research is focused in industrial organization and environmental economics. Jing's current projects are on network effects in the adoption of electric vehicles and on biofuel regulation. Jing graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2011 with a BS in Economics and a BS in Mathematics and Computer Science.


Zhenyu Li
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program/Water-Energy Nexus Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Application of innovative membrane technology and renewable energy for water desalination and reuse

Dr. Zhenyu Li is a postdoctoral research fellow for Water-Energy Nexus project in the Belfer Center's Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program. Before joining the Belfer Center, Zhenyu was a research scientist in Water Desalination and Reuse Center at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Saudi Arabia.
His research focuses on the application of innovative membrane technology and renewable energy for water desalination and reuse. He holds a PhD in biotechnology from Prince of Songkla University, Thailand.


Stephanie Lo
Pre-doctoral Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD student in Economics

Stephanie's research interests include the intersection of behavioral economics, macroeconomics, economics of environmental regulation, and energy economics. She is particularly interested in measuring the macroeconomic implications of changes in environmental policy and the subsequent changes in energy usage and pricing. She is also interested in using behavioral economics to understand the potential for unintended firm behavior resulting from environmental regulations. Stephanie graduated from Harvard with a B.A. in economics in 2010 and spent the past two years trading natural gas at a proprietary trading firm, spending a significant portion of her time trying to understand environmental regulations and their impact on firm-level decisions of drillers and producers in the industry and overall effect on natural gas supply and pricing.

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Daniel Madigan
French Environmental Fellow, 2015-2017

Dan Madigan is a marine ecologist interested in the interaction between pelagic ecology, contaminant transfer in food webs, fisheries, and anthropogenic environmental change.
Dan earned a BA in biology from Dartmouth College in 2005 and a PhD in biology from Stanford University in 2013. He has conducted fieldwork in Costa Rica, Jamaica, The Bahamas, Mexico, Alaska, Taiwan, and Japan. His dissertation research was based on elucidating the ecology and migratory dynamics of wide-ranging pelagic species such as tunas and sharks in the Pacific Ocean. His research has utilized stable isotope analysis, amino acid compound-specific stable isotope analysis, and Fukushima-derived radionuclides to assess trophic linkages in the California Current and the migratory dynamics of overfished Pacific bluefin tuna; his work using radionuclides in Pacific bluefin was awarded ASLO’s Lindeman award in 2014. From 2013-2015, Dan worked as an NSF Post-Doctoral Fellow, expanding his work to include mercury in collaboration with Stony Brook University, NOAA, and University of Hawaii.
As a HUCE Environmental Fellow, Dan will work with Elsie Sunderland of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and James McCarthy of the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology. His work at HUCE will focus on understanding the impacts of changing contaminant levels in the environment on the overall health of global fisheries. Dan will be part of an inter-disciplinary team that also includes researchers at MIT and UBC to combine contaminant emissions, atmospheric and ocean transport, ocean ecology, and fisheries dynamics into a single “unified global model” that assesses the present and future effects of contaminants on global fisheries.


Lawrence Makovich
Senior Fellow, Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Least cost pathways to reducing electricity CO2 emissions footprints.

Larry Makovich’s research focuses on the electricity CO2 emission footprint (annual lbs CO2 emissions per capita associated with electric consumption). The analysis framework separates the contributions from the demand-side factor (KWh per capita) and a supply-side factor (CO2 emissions per Kwh generated).
The framework defines an electric system climate policy challenge as closing the gap between expected electric system CO2 emission footprint and the CO2 emission footprints aligned with the recommendations of climate scientists within the available window of opportunity. 
The research finds that meeting the climate policy challenge requires a developed economy electricity sector to lead by example. To do this requires supporting the electricity needs of a modern electric intensive lifestyle while meeting CO2 emission footprint policy targets.
A case study of California electric climate policy initiatives employs the CO2 emission footprint analysis framework as a metric for policy evaluation. The case study identifies California electricity sector climate initiative shortcomings and examines lessons regarding climate policy formulation, implementation and evaluation.
The research concludes with an assessment of the least cost combination of demand and supply side options that can move the US electricity sector to demonstrate how to support the electricity needs of a modern electric intensive lifestyle while meeting CO2 emission footprint policy targets.


Zhimin Mao
Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Sustainability Science, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, HKS

Zhimin Mao is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Belfer Center's Environment and Natural Resources Program with a focus on China's low carbon development. Prior to joining the Belfer Center, Zhimin was a Ph.D. fellow at the Pardee RAND Graduate School and an assistant policy analyst at the RAND Corporation.
Her research interests include climate change adaptation, energy and environment policy, and economic development. Her RAND experience includes interdisciplinary research on decision making under deep uncertainty, energy and climate change policy, and international development. Example projects include two World Bank-funded projects: one to enhance the climate resilience of Africa's energy and water infrastructure, and the other to help Ho Chi Minh City evaluate its flood control plan in the face of global climate change. Other research experience includes analyzing technical and economic tradeoffs of various plant configurations of concentrated solar power in India for investors and policy makers; development of an indicator system that evaluates a country's Food-Energy-Water security index; as well as several projects related to China's urban development, natural resources, and environment governance challenges. Prior to RAND, she worked at the Heinz Center, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, and the Asian Development Bank.


Laura J. Martin
Ziff Environmental Fellow, 2015-2017

Laura Jane Martin is a historian and ecologist who studies the cultural and political dimensions of ecological management.
Laura earned an ScB in biophysics from Brown University in 2006, an M.S. in natural resources from Cornell University in 2010, and a PhD in natural resources from Cornell in 2015. While at Cornell, she received national fellowships in both the sciences and the humanities. Through fieldwork, she studied the impact of human activities on the ecology and evolution of wetland species, publishing in Journal of Ecology, Conservation Biology, Trends in Ecology and the Environment, and elsewhere. Through archival research, she investigated the history of ecological restoration in the 20th century United States. Her current work is situated at the nexus of environmental history and science & technology studies.
As an Environmental Fellow, Laura will work with Peter Galison from the Department of the History of Science. She plans to develop her dissertation research into a book that explores how ecological restoration became such a widespread and important environmental practice. She will also begin a project on the use of counter-terrorism technologies for international biodiversity protection. By fostering conversations among scientists and humanists, Laura hopes to generate research that can guide 21st century environmental management.


Leonardo Maugeri
Senior Fellow, Geopolitics of Energy Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Leonardo Maugeri is currently a Senior Fellow with the Geopolitics of Energy Project and the Environment and Natural Resources Program at the Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.
One of the world's foremost experts on oil, gas, and energy, Maugeri has been one of the most distinguished top managers of Eni, the largest Italian company, which is also ranked number 6 among the largest international oil companies. At Eni, he held the position of Senior Executive Vice President of Strategies and Development (2000–2010) and eventually became Executive Chairman of Polimeri Europa, Eni's petrochemical branch (March 2010–June 2011). In 2008, Maugeri promoted the strategic alliance between Eni and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), which—among other outcomes—led to the establishment of the Eni-MIT Solar Frontiers Center in 2010.


Nathaniel Mueller
National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow
Research Topic: Statistical modeling of the relationship of climate and crop yield

Nathan Mueller is an applied ecologist who studies how agricultural systems influence – and are influenced by – global environmental change.
During his two-year fellowship, Nathan is working with Peter Huybers of the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and Noel Michele Holbrook of the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology to improve statistical models relating climate to crop yield. His work also investigates the interaction between changing agricultural management practices and climate using recently compiled time-series data.

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Janhavi Nilekani 
Giorgio Ruffolo Doctoral Research Fellow, Fellow, Sustainability Science Program, Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government, Harvard Kennedy School
Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD Student in Public Policy

Janhavi Nilekani is a Giorgio Ruffolo Doctoral Research Fellow in the Sustainability Science Program and a doctoral candidate in the Public Policy Program at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. Her research focuses on evaluating the relative costs and benefits of different policy instruments for controlling environmental pollution, with an emphasis on India. Janhavi is contributing to collaborative work by the Initiative on Building Public-Private Partnerships to Promote Sustainable Development in India led by Professor Rohini Pande. Janhavi received her BA, cum laude, in economics and international studies and the Ronald Meltzer/Cornelia Awdziewicz Economic Award from Yale University in 2010. She has worked as a research associate on a pilot emissions trading program for Indian industry at the Jameel Poverty Action Lab-South Asia (2011-2012). Her faculty host is Rohini Pande.

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Nick Obradovich
Postdoctoral Fellow, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program
Research Topic: Climate change impacts and adaptation

Nick Obradovich is a postdoctoral fellow in the Belfer Center's Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program. He studies climate-change politics and the potential impacts of climate change on social systems. He is also a research scientist at the MIT Media Lab and a Human-Environmental Systems Fellow at Scripps Institution of Oceanography.
Nick received his PhD in political science from the University of California, San Diego and his BS, summa cum laude, in Economics and Environmental Studies from Santa Clara University.


Dayea Oh
Pre-doctoral Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD student in Public Policy
Research Topic: Energy economics, Electric power market design

Dayea's research interests are energy economics and industrial organization. She is especially interested in the electricity market, on the regulation design and improving the efficiency and stability of the power grid. Prior to enrolling at Harvard, Dayea studied mathematical economics at Rice University and applied economics at Cornell University. Her master's thesis was about welfare analysis of California renewable electricity policies, where she claimed the interaction effects between the federal level fiscal incentives and state level regulations designed to encourage renewable electricity producers are in fact negative when they coexist.

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Lucy Page
Research Fellow, Evidence for Policy Design (EPoD)

Lucy Page is a Research Fellow at Evidence for Policy Design (EPoD) at the Harvard Kennedy School, where she works with Professor Rohini Pande. Lucy is interested in the intersection of environmental and development economics, particularly in the economic impacts of climate change. At EPoD, her research explores the impacts of India’s environmental clearance regulations and the design of policies governing reconstruction after natural disasters, focusing on reconstruction of housing following the 2015 earthquake in Nepal. Prior to joining EPoD, Lucy consulted with the EPA and the World Bank on climate change economics while at Industrial Economics, Inc., studied wildlife management in Mongolia, and wrote a senior thesis on the impacts of temperature on the rate of occupational accidents in the US. Lucy holds a BA in Mathematics from Williams College.


Jisung Park
Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD student in Economics

Jisung Park is a PhD candidate in the economics department at Harvard University, where he specializes in environmental economics, public, and labor economics. His research focuses on how climate change may affect human development, including labor productivity and human capital impacts of heat stress.
Jisung is also an economics and public service tutor at Eliot House, one of Harvard's undergraduate houses, and teaches Principles of Economics (Ec-10) with Greg Mankiw, as well as American Economic Policy (Ec-1420) with Martin Feldstein, Larry Summers, and Jeff Liebman. He has also taught Environmental Economics (Ec-1661) with Robert Stavins.
A native of Lawrence, Kansas, and Seoul, South Korea, he received his undergraduate education in economics and political science from Columbia University ('09), and attended Oxford for two successive Masters programs in Environmental Change and Management (’10) and Development Economics (’11) on a Rhodes Scholarship (New York District, 2009).


Wei Peng
Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Sustainability Science, Environment and Natural Resources Program
Research fields: Energy-air pollution-water-carbon nexus; Integrated assessment; China’s energy governance

Wei’s research focuses on integrating air quality, water and climate concerns into China’s energy strategy.  She examines a variety of energy policies in China, and studies potential synergies and tradeoffs to simultaneously achieve air pollution, water conservation and carbon mitigation goals.  She is also interested in the distributional effects of energy and environmental policies.  She holds a PhD in Public Policy from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and a BS in Environmental Sciences from Peking University in China.  She was a Woodrow Wilson Scholar and Princeton Energy and Climate Scholar.


Ari Peskoe
Senior Fellow in Electricity Law, Environmental Policy Initiative, HLS
Research Topic: Interplay between federal and state regulators over the electricity sector and regulation of distributed energy resources

Ari Peskoe is the Senior Fellow in Electricity Law at the Policy Initiative. He currently focuses on the roles of federal and state regulators and tracks legal challenges to state electricity policies.  In addition, Ari also researches emerging regulatory structures for distributed energy resources, particularly rooftop solar.  Prior to the Policy Initiative, Ari was an associate at a law firm in Washington, DC, where he litigated before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission about the western energy crisis. He received his JD from Harvard Law School and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with degrees in electrical engineering and business.


Daniel Poneman
Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Daniel Poneman is a Senior Fellow with the Belfer Center. Prior to his appointment in October 2014, Poneman had been Deputy Secretary of Energy since 2009, in which capacity he also served as Chief Operating Officer of the Department. Between April 23, 2013, and May 21, 2013, Poneman served as Acting Secretary of Energy.
Poneman's responsibilities at the Department of Energy spanned the full range of President Obama’s all-of-the-above energy strategy, including fossil and nuclear energy, renewables and energy efficiency, and international cooperation around the world. He led 2009 negotiations to address Iran’s nuclear program and participated in the Deputies' Committee at the National Security Council. He played an instrumental role in the Department’s response to crises from Fukushima to the Libyan civil war to Hurricane Sandy, and led the Department’s efforts to strengthen emergency response and cybersecurity across the energy sector.
Poneman first joined the Department of Energy in 1989 as a White House Fellow. The next year he joined the National Security Council staff as Director of Defense Policy and Arms Control. From 1993 through 1996, Poneman served as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Nonproliferation and Export Controls at the National Security Council. Prior to assuming his responsibilities as Deputy Secretary, Poneman served as a principal of The Scowcroft Group for eight years, providing strategic advice to corporations on a wide variety of international projects and transactions. Between tours of government service, he practiced law for nine years in Washington, D.C. – first as an associate at Covington & Burling, later as a partner at Hogan & Hartson.
Poneman received AB and JD degrees with honors from Harvard University and an MLitt in Politics from Oxford University. He has published widely on energy and national security issues and is the author of Nuclear Power in the Developing World and Argentina: Democracy on Trial. His third book, Going Critical: The First North Korean Nuclear Crisis (coauthored with Joel Wit and Robert Gallucci), received the 2005 Douglas Dillon Award for Distinguished Writing on American Diplomacy. Poneman is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.
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Tao Ren
Predoctoral Research Fellow, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program

Tao REN is a predoctoral research fellow in the Belfer Center's Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, a Ph.D. candidate in public policy at Tsinghua University (THU), and a research fellow at THU's Center for Science, Technology, and Education. He researches topics related to intergovernmental relationships, collaborative governance, process of decision-making, and social network analysis. His doctoral dissertation analyzes why and how Chinese government departments coordinate with each other in the field of low-carbon policy by conducting social network analysis.


Kevin Rowe
Pre-doctoral Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD student in Public Policy

Kevin Rowe is a PhD student in Public Policy at Harvard University, a Pre-doctoral Fellow of the Harvard Environmental Economics Program, and a PhD Affiliate of Evidence for Policy Design (EPoD). He is interested in environmental and energy economics and policy, particularly in developing countries. Prior to beginning his PhD, Kevin was a Research Fellow at EPoD at Harvard, where he worked on randomized field evaluations of reforms to air and water pollution control policies in India. Kevin has a Master in Public Policy from Harvard University and a Bachelor of Arts in Government from Hamilton College. Following his undergraduate degree, Kevin was a Thomas J. Watson Fellow and worked at the World Resources Institute.

Cristine Russell
Senior Fellow, Environment and Natural Resources Program & Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy
Research Topic: The future of science writing and how to improve news media coverage of controversial science, environment, energy and health issues.

Cristine Russell is an award-winning freelance journalist who has written about science, health, and the environment for more than three decades. She was a former national science reporter for The Washington Post and The Washington Star and currently writes for publications such as Columbia Journalism Review. She is the immediate past President of the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing, and a past president of the National Association of Science Writers. She is an honorary member of Sigma Xi, the scientific research society, and has a biology degree from Mills College. She was a Spring 2006 Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics, and Public Policy and teaches a Harvard Kennedy School class on “Controversies in Climate, Energy and the Media.” Her research focuses on the future of science writing and how to improve news media coverage of controversial scientific issues. She is organizing workshops for reporters and scientists and planning a book on current controversies in science, health, and the environment.

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Trisha Shrum
Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD Student in Public Policy

Trisha Shrum's research interests include climate change and energy policy as seen through the disciplinary lenses of environmental and behavioral economics. Her dissertation work uses behavioral experiments to better understand how people incorporate and utilize information to make economic decisions on energy consumption and climate change mitigation. She graduated from the University of Kansas with bachelor's degrees in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Science and with a minor in Economics. She went on to work on climate change and energy policy as a research fellow at the Kansas Energy Council and earned her Master’s in Environmental Science from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.


Afreen Siddiqi
Visiting Scholar, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Linkages between water, energy, and food security

Dr. Afreen Siddiqi is a visiting scholar with the Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program at Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. She is also as a research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Her research expertise is at the intersection of technology, policy, and international development. She combines quantitative tools and qualitative methods for complex socio-technical systems analysis. Her work includes a focus on investigating how water and agriculture sectors impact energy consumption and implications for energy policy. She is examining critical linkages between water, energy, and food security at urban, provincial, and national scales in the Middle East and North Africa, and analyzing the hydro-power portfolio in the Indus basin of Pakistan.
Dr. Siddiqi has an SB in Mechanical Engineering and an SM and PhD in Aerospace Systems, all from MIT. She has been a recipient of the Amelia Earhart Fellowship, Richard D. DuPont Fellowship, and the Rene H. Miller Prize in Systems Engineering. She has engineering experience in National Instruments (in Austin, Texas) and Schlumberger (in Houston, Texas), consulting experience with BP, Lockheed Martin, and Aurora Flight Systems, and teaching experience at MIT and Universita della Svizzera italiana in Switzerland.


Alexandre Strapasson
Giorgio Ruffolo Research Fellow in Sustainability Science, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs
Research Topic: Bioenergy, land use, climate change, global dynamics

Alexandre Strapasson is a research fellow, working on sustainable energy transitions, with a special interest in complex systems and global dynamics. His research focuses on the role of bioenergy to help decarbonize the EU energy system. Prior to joining Harvard, he was an honorary research fellow at Imperial College London and a visiting lecturer at IFP Energies Nouvelles in France. He was one of the lead modelers of the “Global Calculator” project (www.globalcalculator.org), and a joint Principal Investigator of the “EU Land Use Futures” project developed in collaboration with the former UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO). Alexandre was also Director of the Department of Bioenergy at the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, and a Consultant in energy and climate change of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). He holds an MS. in Energy from the University of São Paulo (USP), and a Ph.D. in Energy and Environment from Imperial College.


 Daniel Stuart
Pre-doctoral Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD student in Public Policy

Daniel is interested in energy and environmental economics, public economics, and industrial organization. Prior to his Ph.D. studies, he worked as a research assistant at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and as a Pre-Doctoral Fellow at the Energy Policy Institute at Chicago. Daniel received a B.A. in Economics with Honors from Swarthmore College.

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Shauna B. Theel
Louis M. Bacon Environmental Leadership Fellow, Center for Public Leadership, Harvard Kennedy School

Shauna B. Theel has worked over the last several years in media positions in the energy space. First, as Climate and Energy Program Director at Media Matters for America, a not-for-profit, web-based media watchdog, Shauna was editor for all energy and environment work and managed long term projects capturing data on the amount and nature of media coverage on climate change and clean energy. The first action of the Senate Climate Action task force was to take a study she had overseen on climate coverage to the broadcast networks, which then covered climate change more in one Sunday show than they had in the last three years of Sunday shows. After this position, she served as Deputy Director, Digital Media at American Wind Energy Association, the trade association for the U.S. wind industry. In this position, she coordinated blogs, op-eds, letters to the editor and developed the organization’s social media strategy and outreach plan. She graduated magna cum laude from the University of California, Berkeley.


Mauricio Tolmasquim
Visiting Fellow, Harvard Electricity Policy Group, Harvard Kennedy School

Mauricio Tolmasquim, who was President of  Empresa de Pesquisa Energetica (Brazil’s energy and planning authority) from 2006-2016, was responsible for establishing energy auctions to enable energy expansion and price reductions. During his term, Brazil successfully launched 32 power auctions, contracting 77 GW of new generation capacity. Previously, as Deputy and Interim Minister of the Ministry of Mines, Tolmasquim led the technical working group responsible for the institutional reform of the power sector, shifting the focus toward long-term agreements. He also spearheaded the study in support of Brazil’s Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) submitted to the UNFCCC in 2015. He participated in the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on a New Energy Architecture. His awards include recognition by Wind Power Monthly as one of the Global Top 30 People in the Wind Sector. During his time as an HEPG Visiting Fellow, Tolmasquim is working on research into renewable energy policy.


Jeff Y. Tsao
Research Fellow, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program

Jeff Tsao is a "late-career" research fellow in the Belfer Center's Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program. His Ph.D. was in Applied Physics at Harvard, and most of his career has been in research, management, and "community organizing" in the areas of semiconductor materials, solid-state lighting, and energy economics. His current interests are shifting towards the "engineering and applied science" of research: developing/applying the social science of human/group creativity to understanding/improving research processes at the individual, group, institution, and policy levels.


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Daniel Velez-Lopez
Pre-doctoral Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD student in Public Policy

Daniel's current research focuses environmental and energy policy both in the United States and the developing world. He is particularly interested in how features of developing countries such as liquidity constraints or missing financial markets affect the value of information for individuals and firms and their ability to adapt to changes in their environment. He is also interested in studying the effectiveness and efficiency of second-best environmental policies such as daily driving restrictions that are common in developing countries.

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Pu Wang
Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Sustainability Science, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Cap and trade systems for greenhouse gas emissions in China and China-US cooperation on climate change policies

Pu Wang received his PhD degree from Cornell University in 2014, in the field of natural resources. His research is motivated by the great potential of market-based environmental policies in addressing social and environmental challenges associated with climate change. In particular, he is interested in the application of market-based policies in the context of socioeconomic inequalities.
As a postdoctoral fellow, his research focuses on cap and trade systems for greenhouse-gas emissions in China and China-U.S. cooperation in climate change policies.

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Kaho Yu
Associate, Geopolitics of Energy Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: China’s gas expansion, the eastward shift of Russian energy strategy, and the geopolitical implications for the Asia-Pacific region

Kaho’s research focuses on the geopolitics of China’s energy security, “Belt and Road Initiative”, Sino-Russian energy cooperation, and China’s role in global energy governance. In particular, his research at Harvard seeks to understand the development of China’s gas expansion under the framework of President Xi Jinping’s “Belt and Road Initiative,” the eastward shift of Russian energy strategy, and the geopolitical implications for Asia-Pacific. In addition to his appointment at Harvard, Kaho serves as a Research Fellow at the Center for International Energy Security Studies at Chinese Academy of Social Science, European Center for Energy and Resources Security at King’s College London, Renmin University Chongyang Institute and Asian Energy Studies Centre at Hong Kong Baptist University. Since 2013, he has been teaching a master course on Geopolitics of Energy at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He is now finishing his PhD at King’s College London and the thesis topic is “From energy diplomacy to global governance: A case study on China’s energy security in the 21st century.” In addition, Kaho observes Chinese energy policy and Eurasian energy geopolitics closely and regularly produces energy strategy reports in both Chinese and English. He is also one of the authors of the Blue Book of World Energy of the Chinese Academy of Social Science.

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