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Joseph Aldy

headshot Joe Aldy

Joe Aldy is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School.  His research focuses on climate change policy, energy policy, and mortality risk valuation. Before coming to HKS, he served as the Special Assistant to the President for Energy and Environment, reporting through both the National Economic Council and the Office of Energy and Climate Change. Aldy was a Fellow at Resources for the Future from 2005 to 2008 and served on the staff of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers from 1997 to 2000.  He also served as the Co-Director of the Harvard Project on International Climate Agreements, Co-Director of the International Energy Workshop, and Treasurer for the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists before joining the Obama Administration.  He holds a PhD in economics from Harvard University, a Master of Environmental Management degree from the Nicholas School of the Environment, and a BA from Duke University.
e: joseph_aldy@hks.harvard.edu
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Christopher Avery

Christopher Avery headshotChristopher Avery is a Roy E. Larsen Professor of Public Policy, and teaches analytic courses in microeconomics and statistics. He studies rating and selection mechanisms, focusing on the college admissions system. His first book, The Early Admissions Game, coauthored with Andrew Fairbanks and Richard Zeckhauser, was publishedby Harvard University Press in March 2003. In his current research, he studies college application patterns and college enrollment choices for high school students. He completed a PhD in economic analysis at the Stanford Business School and holds prior degrees from Harvard and Cambridge universities.
e: christopher_avery@ksg.harvard.edu
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Linda Bilmes
| Blog

linda bilmesLinda J. Bilmes is widely considered one of the leading experts in US budgeting and public finance. She has held several senior positions in government, including Assistant Secretary and Chief Financial Officer of the US Department of Commerce, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Administration, and US Representative to several high-ranking commissions, including a Treasury Department commission to examine the viability of the Inter-American Investment Corporation. She was recently appointed to the National Parks Centennial CommissionPreviously, Bilmes spent eight years with the global management consulting firm The Boston Consulting Group, where she focused on industrial strategy and transition to market-based democracy in Eastern Europe and Russia. Bilmes is a now a full-time faculty member at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, where she teaches budgeting, applied budgeting, and public finance. She is a faculty affiliate with the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government, the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, and the Rappaport Center for Greater Boston.  At Harvard, Bilmes runs an innovative program to assist local cities and towns with their financial health, leading teams of graduate student volunteers who work in the communities. She also conducts the Harvard Institute of Politics budgeting workshops for newly-elected Mayors and Members of Congress. Bilmes has written extensively on financial and budgetary issues, including the cost of the Iraq War, veterans’ health and disability costs, state and local employee pensions, and federal workforce reform. She is the author of "Soldiers Returning From Iraq and Afghanistan: The Long-term Costs of Providing Veterans Medical Care and Disability Benefits” and co-author (with Joseph Stiglitz) of "The Economic Costs of The Iraq War:  An Appraisal Three Years After the Beginning of The Conflict." Her book The People Factor: Strengthening America by Investing in Public Service (co-authored with W. Scott Gould) will be published in June, 2008.  Bilmes is a regular commentator on financial topics. Her articles have appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Financial Times, Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe, and the Atlantic Monthly.  She is frequently interviewed on TV and radio programs, including the News Hour with Jim Lehrer, CNN's Lou Dobbs Show, ABC’s World News Tonight and NPR's On Point. She recently featured in Charles Ferguson’s award-winning documentary film about Iraq, “No End In Sight”. Bilmes has testified at several congressional hearings regarding the costs of the Iraq war, including the US House of Representatives Budget Committee, Veterans Affairs Committee, and Veterans Affairs Subcommittee on Disability Assistance and Memorial Affairs. Bilmes holds a BA and an MBA from Harvard University.
e: linda_bilmes@ksg.harvard.edu
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Iris Bohnet | Website

bohnetIris Bohnet, Professor of Public Policy, Faculty Chair of the Women and Public Policy Program, and co-Faculty Chair of the World Economic Forum's Young Global Leaders Executive Program at the Kennedy School, teaches courses on behavioral decision analysis and negotiation. She serves on the executive committee of the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School and on the boards of the Graduate Institute for International Studies in Geneva, Switzerland, the Vienna University of Economics and Business Administrations, Austria, and the Negotiations Center at the University of Texas at Dallas. A behavioral economist, her research combines insights from economics and psychology. Her research focuses on trust--its determinants and its relevance for negotiation, individual and collective decision-making. She runs her experimental studies in different parts of the world, examining the determinants and effects of trust from a cross-cultural perspective. Bohnet has published widely in the leading academic journals, such as, e.g., the American Economic Review, the American Political Science Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. A Swiss citizen, she holds a PhD in economics from the University of Zurich. She spent a year as a Research Fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. She is married and has two children.
e: iris_bohnet@ksg.harvard.edu
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Lewis M. Branscomb

branscombLewis M. Branscomb is Aetna Professor in Public Policy and Corporate Management, Emeritus. As former director for the Kennedy School's Science, Technology and Public Policy Program, Professor Branscomb's research focuses on domestic and international technology policy, the financing and management of innovations, and technical means for countering terrorism. Branscomb graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor's degree in physics from Duke University and holds a PhD. from Harvard. He holds honorary degrees from 14 universities. He is director of Lord Corporation.. A former research physicist, Professor Branscomb was appointed director of the US National Bureau of Standards by President Nixon. From 1972 to 1986 he was Vice President and Chief Scientist of IBM Corporation. Branscomb was also appointed to the President's Science Advisory Committee by President Johnson, to the National Productivity Advisory Committee by President Reagan and to the National Science Board by President Carter. He is a member of the National Academies of Engineering and of Sciences, and the National Academy of Public Administration. His most recent books include Making the Nation Safer: Science and Technology for Countering Terrorism, Taking Technical Risks with Philip Auerswald, Industrializing Knowledge, edited with Fumio Kodama and Richard Florida, and Investing in Innovation edited with James Keller.
e: lewis_branscomb@ksg.harvard.edu
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William Clark

donahueWilliam Clark is the Harvey Brooks Professor of International Science, Public Policy and Human Development at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. Trained as an ecologist, his research focuses on the interactions of environment, development and security concerns in international affairs, with a special emphasis on the role of science and technology in shaping those interactions. Clark is co-author of Adaptive Environmental Assessment and Management (Wiley, 1978) and Redesigning Rural Development (Hopkins, 1982); editor of the Carbon Dioxide Review (Oxford, 1982); and coeditor of Sustainable Development of the Biosphere (Cambridge, 1986), The Earth as Transformed by Human Action (Cambridge, 1990), Learning To Manage Global Environmental Risks (MIT, 2001), and Global Environmental Assessments: Information and Influence (MIT, 2006). He serves on the editorial boards of the Proceedings of the US National Academy of Sciences, and Annual Review of Environment and Natural Resources. Clark is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, where he served on the Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability and co-chaired the study Our Common Journey: A Transition Toward Sustainability (National Research Council, 1999). At Harvard, he co-directs the Sustainability Science Program. Clark is a recipient of the MacArthur Prize, the Humboldt Prize, and the Kennedy School's Carballo Award for excellence in teaching.
e: william_clark@harvard.edu
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John D. Donahue

donahueJohn D. Donahue is the Raymond Vernon Lecturer in Public Policy at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, where he has taught since 1987. His teaching, writing, and research deal with public sector reform and with the distribution of public responsibilities across levels of government and sectors of the economy. He has written or edited ten books, including Disunited States (1997) and The Privatization Decision (1989, with four translations 1990-92) and most recently The Warping of Government Work (forthcoming). Donahue is the faculty chair of the Curriculum Development and Support Program announced in mid-2007, and is a steering-committee member and inaugural instructor for the joint degree program the Kennedy School and Harvard Business School will launch in 2008. From 2000 to 2003 he directed the Visions of Governance in the 21st Century research project, and since 2003 has directed the Weil Program on Collaborative Governance. Donahue served in the first Clinton Administration as an Assistant Secretary and as Counselor to the Secretary of Labor. He has been a consultant to public and private organizations including the World Bank, the National Economic Council, and the RAND Corporation, and also serves as an advisor or trustee for several non-profits. A native of Indiana, he holds a B.A. from Indiana University and an M.P.P. and Ph.D. from Harvard.
e: john_donahue@ksg.harvard.edu
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Mark Fagan

mark fagan headshotMark Fagan is an Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy and former Senior Fellow at the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government at Harvard Kennedy School. The focus of his research is on the role of regulation in competitive markets. He has written about the impact of deregulation in the railroad industry including a recent paper published by Transportation examining the impact of regulatory differences on rail freight share between the United States and the European Union. He has also examined the impact of electricity restructuring in the United States. The research in electricity markets has been published in the Electricity Journal and cited in the New York Times. Other research papers include the role of government in the financing of small and medium size enterprises to foster growth in China and the need for institutional innovation to support technology and globalization, a collaboration between Mr. Fagan and the Vice Minister for Science and Technology in China.At the Harvard Kennedy School, Mr. Fagan teaches Operations Management and Lobbying: An Experiential Learning Opportunity. He also is a Lecturer in Law at Boston University School of Law where he teaches Securitization, Lobbying and the Law, and Trust and Honesty in the Real World. Mark Fagan is a founding partner of Norbridge, Inc. a general management consulting firm that has a distinctive competence in the transportation sector. Mr. Fagan specializes in helping companies solve operations management challenges. He works with clients in the transportation, telecommunications and utility industries as they grapple with increasing shareholder value in a deregulated world. Mr. Fagan earned a Masters Degree in City and Regional Planning at Harvard University and a BA at Bucknell University.
e: mark_fagan@hks.harvard.edu
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Jeffrey Frankel | Blog

frankelJeffrey Frankel is Harpel Professor of Capital Formation and Growth at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. He directs the program in International Finance and Macroeconomics at the National Bureau of Economic Research, where he is also a member of the Business Cycle Dating Committee, which officially declared the start and end of the 2001 recession. He was appointed to the Council of Economic Advisers by President Clinton in 1996, was subsequently confirmed by the Senate, and served until 1999. His responsibilities as Member included international economics, macroeconomics, and the environment. Before moving east, he had been professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley, having joined the faculty in 1979. Other past appointments include the Brookings Institution, Federal Reserve Board, Institute for International Economics, International Monetary Fund, University of Michigan, and Yale. His research interests include international finance, monetary policy, regional blocs, Asia, and global environmental issues. Recent books include American Economic Policy in the 1990s (MIT Press). Born in San Francisco in 1952, he graduated from Swarthmore College in 1974, and received his PhD from MIT in 1978.
e: jeffrey_frankel@ksg.harvard.edu
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Archon Fung | Website

fungArchon Fung is Associate Professor of Public Policy at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. His research examines the impacts of civic participation, public deliberation, and transparency upon public and private governance. Recent books include Full Disclosure: The Perils and Promise of Transparency (Cambridge University Press, 2007, with Mary Graham and David Weil) and Empowered Participation: Reinventing Urban Democracy (Princeton University Press, 2004). Current projects examine democratic reform initiatives in electoral reform, urban planning, public services, ecosystem management, and transnational governance. He has authored five books, three edited collections, and over fifty articles appearing in journals including American Political Science Review, Public Administration Review, Political Theory, Journal of Political Philosophy, Politics and Society, Governance, Journal of Policy and Management, Environmental Management, American Behavioral Scientist, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, and Boston Review. Fung received two S.B.s and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology..
e: archon_fung@ksg.harvard.edu
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Robert Glauber
Robert R. Glauber, Visiting Professor at the Harvard Law School, is retiring as Chairman and CEO of the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD). He served as Under Secretary of the Treasury for Finance from 1989-92, where he was responsible for domestic policy, which included the regulatory overhaul and recapitalization of the S&L industry and proposals for reform of commercial banks. Prior to joining the Treasury, he was Professor of Finance at the Harvard Business School and Chair of its Advanced Management Program. From 1992-2000 he was an Adjunct Lecturer at the Kennedy School. In 1987 he served as Executive Director of the Brady Commission, appointed by former President Ronald Reagan to study the October 1987 stock market crash. His research interests focus on the regulation of financial institutions and markets and on corporate governance issues. He holds an AB and PhD from Harvard.
 
Jose A. Gomez-Ibanez

gomez-ibanezJose A. Gomez-Ibanez is Derek C. Bok Professor of Public Policy and Urban Planning. His research interests are primarily in the area of transportation policy and urban development and in privatization and regulation of infrastructure. He has served as a consultant for a variety of public agencies. His recent books include Regulating Infrastructure: Monopoly, Contracts and Discretion and Competition in the Railway Industry: An International Comparative Analysis (with Gines de Rus). He has also published numerous books and articles on the political economy of highway tolls and congestion pricing, transit privatization, and airline deregulation. He graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College and holds an MPP and PhD from the Kennedy School of Government.
e: jose_gomez@ksg.harvard.edu
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John Haigh

gomez-ibanez John Haigh, Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy, is the Executive Dean of the Kennedy School. He is a member of the Dean’s office, focusing on developing the mission and strategic direction for the school and implementing the strategy. He is also responsible for the management and oversight of the operations of the school. At Mercer Management Consulting, where he was a partner and consultant for 13 years, his work focused on strategy issues in multiple industries including telecommunications, transportation, energy, and the environment. More recently at AT&T, and subsequently AT&T Wireless, he rose rapidly through a variety of strategy and leadership positions. At AT&T he initially focused on strategy and business development issues and was later promoted to President of AT&Ts International Ventures. He then led AT&T Wireless’s emerging initiatives efforts developing new wireless services. Haigh holds a BA from Grinnell College, where he was Phi Beta Kappa and the President’s Medalist, and an MPP from the John F. Kennedy School of Government.
e: John_Haigh@ksg.harvard.edu
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William W. Hogan | Website

hogan

William W. Hogan is the Raymond Plank Professor of Global Energy Policy. He is Research Director of the Harvard Electricity Policy Group at M-R CBG and Chair of the Kennedy School Faculty Appointments Committee. Hogan has served on the faculty of Stanford University, where he founded the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), and he is past president of the International Association for Energy Economics (IAEE). Professor Hogan's research focuses on the interaction of energy economics and public policy, which, in recent years, has meant an emphasis on the restructuring of the electricity industry in the United States and worldwide. He has worked to design the market structures and market rules by which regional transmission organizations, in various forms, coordinate bid-based markets for energy, ancillary services, and financial transmission rights that allow market participants to hedge congestion costs. Selected papers are available on his website, www.whogan.com. He received his undergraduate degree from the U.S. Air Force Academy and his PhD from UCLA.
e: william_hogan@ksg.harvard.edu
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Arnold Howitt

howittArnold M. Howitt is Executive Director of the Kennedy School's Taubman Center for State and Local Government, as well as Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy. He is faculty chair or co-chair of KSG executive programs on Emergency Preparedness, Crisis Management, and of the Beijing Executive Public Training Training Program. For four years he directed KSG's research program on domestic preparedness for terrorism. Howitt served on an Institute of Medicine panel that authored Preparing for Terrorism (2002) and is co-author and co-editor of Countering Terrorism: Dimensions of Preparedness (2003). Howitt's other research focuses on transportation and environmental regulation. He served on a National Research Council panel that wrote Air Quality Management in the United States (2004). He is currently studying transportation and air pollution reduction in China. In addition, he wrote Managing Federalism, a study of the federal grant-in-aid system, and is coauthor and coeditor of Perspectives on Management Capacity Building. He received his BA from Columbia University and his MA and PhD in political science from Harvard University.
e: arnold_howitt@ksg.harvard.edu
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Sheila Jasanoff

jasanoffSheila Jasanoff is professor of Science and Public Policy at the Kennedy School and holds faculty affiliations in History of Science, Public Health, and Environmental Science and Public Policy. A lawyer by training, she has devoted her research career to the interactions of law, science, and politics. Her areas of interest include law, science, and technology; environmental regulation and risk management; and comparative science and technology policy. Before joining Harvard, she was a faculty member at Cornell University for 20 years, where she founded and chaired the Department of Science and Technology Studies. She is the author of Risk Management and Political Culture, The Fifth Branch: Science Advisers as Policymakers, and Science at the Bar: Law, Science, and Technology in America, and co-author of Controlling Chemicals: The Politics of Regulation in Europe and the United States. Jasanoff has held visiting appointments at Yale, Oxford, and Kyoto Universities. She has served on the Board of Directors of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and is president of the Society for Social Studies of Science.
e: sheila_jasanoff@ksg.harvard.edu
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Dale Jorgenson

jorgensonDale Jorgenson is the Samuel W. Morris University Professor at Harvard University. He has directed the Program on Technology and Economic Policy at CBG since 1984. Jorgenson has conducted groundbreaking research on information technology and economic growth, energy and the environment, tax policy and investment behavior, and applied econometrics. He is the author of 232 articles in economics and the author and editor of twenty-six books. Jorgenson has been honored with membership in the American Philosophical Society (1998), the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (1989), the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (1978), and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1969). He received the prestigious John Bates Clark Medal of the American Economic Association in 1971 and was elected President of the Association in 2000.
e: djorgenson@ksg.harvard.edu
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Calestous Juma

Calestous Juma is Professor of the Practice of International Development and Director of the Science, Technology, and Globalization Project. He is a former Executive Secretary of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity and Founding Director of the African Centre for Technology Studies in Nairobi. He also served as Chancellor of the University of Guyana. He has been elected to several scientific and engineering academies including the US National Academy of Sciences, the Royal Society of London, the Academy of Sciences for the Developing World, the Royal Academy of Engineering and African Academy of Sciences.. He has won several international awards for his work on sustainable development. He holds a PhD in science and technology policy studies and has written widely on science, technology, and the environment. He teaches courses in developmental policy as part of the MPA/ID Program. He is lead author of Innovation: Applying Knowledge in Development and editor of Going for Growth: Science, Technology and Innovation in African Development.
e: calestous_juma@ksg.harvard.edu
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Elaine Kamarck

kamarckElaine C. Kamarck, lecturer in public policy, teaches courses and conducts research in 20th century government and in American politics. She came to the Kennedy School in 1997 after having served in the Clinton/Gore White House where she worked directly with Gore to create the National Performance Review, also known as the Reinventing Government project. She also worked on the president’s welfare reform task force, Community Empowerment Board and Olympics task force and the Vice President’s Airline Safety and Security Commission. Before joining the Clinton Administration, she helped found the Progressive Policy Institute and did much of the research that guided the Clinton presidency. She joined the Kennedy School faculty as director of Visions of Governance for the Twenty First Century. She has been a columnist of Newsday and the Los Angles Times and taught at Barnard College, Byrn Mawr College, Georgetown University and the Graduate School of Political Management. Her most recent book is The End of Government... As We Know It: Making Public Policy Work. She holds a doctorate in political science from the University of California, Berkley and a bachelor’s degree from Byrn Mawr College.
e: elaine_kamarck@ksg.harvard.edu
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Robert Lawrence

lawrenceRobert Z. Lawrence is Albert L. Williams Professor of International Trade and Investment at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, a Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He served as a member of the President's Council of Economic Advisers from 1998 to 2000. Lawrence has also been a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution. He has taught at Yale University, where he received his PhD in economics. His research focuses on trade policy. He is the author of Can America Compete?; Crimes and Punishments? An Analysis of Retaliation under the WTO; Regionalism, Multilateralism and Deeper Integration; A US-Middle East Free Trade Agreement: A Circle of Opportunity? and Single World, Divided Nations? He is coauthor of Has Globalization Gone Far Enough? A Prism on Globalization; Globaphobia: Confronting Fears About Open Trade; A Vision for the World Economy; Anchoring Reform with a US-Egypt Free Trade Agreement and Saving Free Trade: A Pragmatic Approach. Lawrence has served on the advisory boards of the Congressional Budget Office, the Overseas Development Council, and the Presidential Commission on United States-Pacific Trade and Investment Policy.
e: robert_lawrence@ksg.harvard.edu
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Henry Lee

leeHenry Lee holds three positions at the John F. Kennedy School of Government. He is the Jaidah Family Director of the Environment and Natural Resources Program, within the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Faculty Co-Chair of the Kennedy School International Infrastructure Program, and a Lecturer in Public Policy. Before joining the School in 1979, Mr. Lee spent nine years in Massachusetts state government as Director of the State's Energy Office and Special Assistant to the Governor for environmental policy. He has served on numerous state, federal, and private advisory committees on both energy and environmental issues, and is working with private and public organizations, including the Department of Energy, Interior, U.S. EPA, the National Park Service, the Pew Foundation, the Brazilian National Development Bank, and the Inter American Development Bank. His research interests have focused on electricity and water privatization, environmental management, global climate change, and the political economy of energy. He is the editor of Shaping Responses to Climate Change, the report of the Harvard Global Environment Policy Program and is the author of several recent reports on energy infrastructure.
e: henry_lee@ksg.harvard.edu
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Herman (Dutch) Leonard

Herman B. ("Dutch") Leonard is the George F. Baker, Jr. Professor of Public Sector Management at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government and Eliot I. Snider and Family Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School. He teaches extensively in executive programs at the Business School and the Kennedy School and around the world in the areas of general organizational strategy, governance, performance management, organizational development, strategic management, crisis management and leadership, advocacy and persuasion, innovation, creativity, effective decision-making, and public finance. His current work in leadership and management is focused on corporate social responsibility and on the relationship between governance, accountability, and performance, and emphasizes the use of performance management as a tool for enhancing accountability. He has also worked and taught extensively in the area of crisis management. He is the author of Checks Unbalanced: The Quiet Side of Public Spending (1984), of By Choice or By Chance: Tracking the Values in Massachusetts Public Spending (1992), and (annually from 1994 through 1999) of The Federal Budget and the States (an annual report on the geographic distribution of federal spending and taxation). Professor Leonard is a member of the Board of Directors of Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, a 1,000,000-member Massachusetts HMO. He was for a decade a member of the board of directors of the Massachusetts Health and Educational Facilities Authority, and was a member of the U.S. Comptroller General's Research and Education Advisory Panel and of the Massachusetts Commission on Performance Enhancement. He has been a financial advisor to the Connecticut Governor's Office of Policy and Management, to the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority, and to the Central Artery-Third Harbor Tunnel Project. Professor Leonard was a member of the Governor's Council on Economic Policy for the State of Alaska, of the Governor's Advisory Council on Infrastructure in Massachusetts, and of the U.S. Senate Budget Committee's Private Sector Advisory Committee on Infrastructure. He served as chairman of the Massachusetts Governor's Task Force on Tuition Prepayment Plans, on the National Academy of Sciences Committees on National Urban Policy and on the Superconducting Supercollider, and on the New York City Comptroller's Debt Management Advisory Committee. In addition to his academic studies and teaching, he has been chief financial officer and chief executive officer of a human services agency and has served as a director of public, non-profit, and private sector organizations.
e: dutch_leonard@ksg.harvard.edu
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Jennifer Lerner

Dr. Jennifer Lerner is Professor of Public Policy and Management at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. She also holds faculty affiliations with Harvards Center for Public Leadership, Harvards Psychology Department, Harvards Center for Business and Government, and Harvards Business School (where she teaches executive education). Lerner co-founded and directs the Harvard Kennedy School Bio-Behavioral Laboratory for Decision Research The inter-disciplinary laboratory draws on psychology, economics, and neuroscience to study social and emotional influences on human judgment and decision-making. Her teaching revolves around the same set of topics. Professor Lerner co-founded Harvards doctoral training track in judgment and decision making and will co-create a masters-level course in the field. Professor Lerner has received several awards for her research, including the 2004 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The National Science Foundation and the White House annually award the PECASE as the highest national honor for investigators in the early stages of promising research careers. Lerner completed a Ph.D. (1998) and an M.A. (1994) at the University of California at Berkeley, a B.A. at the University of Michigan Honors College, and a postdoctoral fellowship at UCLA. Grants from the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health have nearly continuously funded her training and research. Professor Lerners research can be found in scientific journals as well as in popular print (e.g., The New York Times) and broadcast media (e.g., Good Morning America). She also gives lectures at universities and government organizations around the world including NATO Headquarters (Brussels) and The White House (Office of Science and Technology Policy).
e:Jennifer_Lerner@ksg.harvard.edu
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Richard Light

lightRichard J. Light teaches statistics and program evaluation at Harvard, with special focus on programs in education. His work emphasizes how to collect and analyze information to improve program management. Mr. Light received his Ph.D. in statistics from Harvard in l969, and was appointed a professor in l974. He has authored or co-authored seven books. His most recent book, “Making the Most of College: Students Speak Their Minds,” was honored by the Virginia and Warren Stone Award for best book of the year on education and society. At Harvard, and at M-RCBG, Mr. Light is currently Director of the Seminar on Assessment. Light has been invited by four Harvard Presidents , Derek Bok, Neil Rudenstine, Lawrence Summers, and most recently Drew Faust, to explore how to make a college education as effective as possible. To do this, Light is bringing together a group of 60 faculty and senior administrators from twenty-four colleges and universities to carry out research on college effectiveness. The group which meets at M-RCBG is encouraged to try innovations on their campuses, and to then rigorously assess the impact of their innovations on student learning. A special feature of Light’s work at M-RCBG is the effort to connect leaders form business and government with leaders from education. Higher education has much to learn business and government about becoming effective “learning organizations”. With the help of a grant for The Spencer Foundation, Light chars this activity, called “The Forum for Excellence and Innovation in Higher Education.” It meets regularly at M-RCBG for a series of two-day executive sessions. Outside of the university, Mr. Light has been president of the American Evaluation Association, an organization of scholars, scientists and managers working to improve public sector services. He has chaired the Panel on Programs for the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, and serves on the National Advisory Board for the Program Evaluation Division of the U.S. General Accounting Office, the research wing of the Congress. Light has been elected to the board of directors of the American Association of Higher Education, and to the board of The Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education. He also has been elected as a fellow The American Association of Arts and Sciences. At the American Academy, he chaired a four year project, sponsored by the Mellon Foundation, that explores how American universities can best respond constructively to the dramatically changing demographics of who attends college in the coming years. Recently Mr. Light was honored with the Paul Lazarsfeld Award for distinguished contributions to scientific practice, and named by Vanderbilt University's Chancellor's Lecture Series as one of America's great teachers.

e: richard_light@ksg.harvard.edu
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Brigitte Madrian

Brigitte Madrian is Professor of Public Policy and Corporate Management in the Aetna Chair. She has been on the faculty at the Wharton School, the University of Chicago, and previously at Harvard. She is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and coeditor of the Journal of Human Resources. Madrian's research focuses on employee benefits and social insurance programs, particularly retirement savings plans and health insurance. Her current research focuses on the relationship between 401(k) plan design and employee saving outcomes. She has also examined the impact of health insurance on the job choice and retirement decisions of employees and the hiring decisions of firms. Madrian received her PhD in economics from MIT and studied economics as an undergraduate at Brigham Young University. She is the recipient of the National Academy of Social Insurance Dissertation Prize (first place, 1994) and the TIAA-CREF Paul A. Samuelson Award for Scholarly Research on Lifelong Financial Security (2002).

Erich Muehlegger

Erich Muehlegger is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School, the faculty chair of M-RCBG’s Regulatory Policy Program and a fellow of the Harvard Environmental Economics Program and the Harvard University Center for the Environment.  His research interests include industrial organization, economic regulation, and environmental policy. His current research projects include estimating the effects of regulatory innovation on illegal activity, modeling cross-border cigarette excise tax avoidance, and estimating the relative efficacy of different hybrid vehicle incentives.  Other research interests include the effects of heterogeneous regulation, and policy implications of behavioral economics. He received his PhD in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2005, where his research studied market impacts of state and local environmental regulation of gasoline content. 

e: erich_muehlegger@ksg.harvard.edu
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Jane Nelson

headshot of Jane NelsonJane Nelson is Director of Harvard Kennedy School's Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative, a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and a senior associate of Cambridge Universitys Programme for Sustainability Leadership. In 2009 she was one of the five track leaders for the Clinton Global Initiative, leading the track on Developing Human Capital. She was a Director at the Prince ofWalesInternational Business Leaders Forum for sixteen years, where she now serves as a senior advisor. In 2001, she worked with the UN Global Compact in the office of the UN Secretary-General preparing a report for the General Assembly on cooperation between the UN and the private sector. Prior to that Nelson worked for the Business Council for Sustainable Development in Africa, for FUNDES in Latin America and as a Vice President at Citibank working in Asia, Europe and the Middle East. She has co-authored four books and over 60 publications on the role of business in society and five of the World Economic Forum's Global Corporate Citizenship reports. Nelson serves on the boards of the World Environment Center, FSG and the ImagineNations Group and on advisory councils for the Initiative for Global Development, UNDPs Growing Inclusive Markets initiative, IFCs Performance Standards Review, GE's Corporate Citizenship group, the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Center, the Global Business Coalition on HIV/AIDS, TB and Malaria, and Instituto Ethos in Brazil. She earned a BSc. degree from the University of Natal in South Africa and an MA from Oxford University, and is a former Rhodes Scholar and recipient of the Keystone Center's 2005 Leadership in Education Award.
e: jane_nelson@ksg.harvard.edu
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Dwight Perkins

perkinsDwight H. Perkins is the principle investigator for the Vietnam Program. Professor Perkins, Harold Hitchings Burbank Professor of Political Economy, joined the Harvard University faculty in 1963 and has held several positions, including his current position as director of the Asia Center. Previously, he was director of the Harvard Institute of International Development, as associate director of the East Asian (now Fairbank) Research Center, and chairman of the Department of Economics. He has served as an advisor or consultant on economic policy and reform to the governments of Korea, China, Malaysia, Vietnam, Ethiopia, and Papua New Guinea. He has also been a consultant to the World Bank, the Ford Foundation, various private corporations, and agencies of the U.S. government. He has been a visiting professor at Hitotsubashi University in Tokyo, the University of Washington, and Fudan University in Shanghai. Professor Perkins served in the U.S. Navy and received his bachelor's degree from Cornell University in far eastern studies and his master's and doctorate degrees in economics from Harvard University.
e: dwight_perkins@ksg.harvard.edu
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Stephen Peterson

Stephen Peterson, Lecturer in Public Policy, is a Senior Development Fellow, Faculty Chair of the Executive Program in Public Financial Management, and Associate of the Center for Business and Government. He is a specialist in public financial management, public management, and decentralization. He has managed development assistance projects in Africa for more than 20 years and advised governments in the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Latin America, Asia, and Africa. He currently directs an integrated financial management reform project in Ethiopia, which is in its 11th year of operation. He has published several books and numerous articles on financial and public management in developing countries. He holds a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, and an MBA in finance and management information systems from the University of California, Los Angeles.
e: stephen_peterson@ksg.harvard.edu
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Roger B. Porter

porterRoger B. Porter, the IBM Professor of Business and Government, served for more than a decade in senior economic policy positions in the White House, most recently as assistant to the President for economic and domestic policy from 1989-93. From 1985-89, Porter was professor of Business and Government and faculty chair of the Program for Senior Managers in Government at the Kennedy School. From 1995-2000 he was director of the Center for Business and Government, and was renamed Director of the Center in August of 2008. Porter served as director of the White House Office of Policy Development in the Reagan Administration, and as executive secretary of the President's Economic Policy Board in the Ford White House. He is the author of several books on economic policy including Presidential Decision Making and Efficiency, Equity, and Legitimacy: The Multilateral Trading System at the Millennium. An alumnus of Brigham Young University, Porter was a Rhodes scholar at Oxford University, where he received his BPhil degree. He was a White House Fellow from 1974-75 and received his master's and PhD. degrees from Harvard University.
e: roger_porter@ksg.harvard.edu
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Jay Rosengard

Jay Rosengard, Lecturer in Public Policy, has 30 years of international experience designing, implementing, and evaluating development policies in: public finance and fiscal strategy, municipal finance and management, intergovernmental fiscal relations, banking and financial institutions development, microfinance, tax reform, management information systems, monitoring and evaluation, human resource development, and public administration. He has worked for a wide variety of multilateral and bilateral donors, as well as directly for host governments and private sector clients. Rosengard is currently Director of the Center for Business and Government's Financial Sector Program, which focuses on the development of bank and nonbank financial institutions and alternative financing instruments. This includes microfinance (small-scale lending and local savings mobilization), mainstream commercial banking (general and special-purpose banks), and wholesale financial intermediation (municipal development funds, venture capital funds, pooled financing, secondary mortgage facilities, and securitization). Rosengard is also Faculty Chair of both the FIPED (Financial Institutions for Private Enterprise Development) Executive Program, which focuses on sustainable and effective microfinance and SME (small and medium enterprise) finance, and the COMTAX (Comparative Tax Policy and Administration) Executive Program, which addresses key strategic and tactical issues in tax design and implementation.
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John Gerard Ruggie | Website

ruggieJohn G. Ruggie is the Berthold Beitz Professor in Human Rights and International Affairs at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, and Affiliated Professor in International Legal Studies at Harvard Law School. From 2005-2011 he was also the United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Representative for Business and Human Rights. Trained as a political scientist, Ruggie has made significant intellectual contributions to the study of international relations, focusing on the impact of globalization on global rule making. A Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, he has received the International Studies Association’s “Distinguished Scholar” award, the American Political Science Association’s Hubert Humphrey award for “outstanding public service by a political scientist,” and a Guggenheim Fellowship. A survey in Foreign Policy magazine has identified him as one of the 25 most influential international relations scholars in the US and Canada. In addition to his academic pursuits, Ruggie has long been involved in practical policy work, initially as a consultant to various agencies of the United Nations and the United States government. From 1997-2001 he was United Nations Assistant Secretary-General for Strategic Planning – a post created specifically for him by then Secretary-General Kofi Annan. His responsibilities included establishing and overseeing the UN Global Compact, now the world’s largest corporate citizenship initiative; proposing and gaining General Assembly approval for the Millennium Development Goals; managing UN relations with Washington; and broadly contributing to the effort at institutional renewal for which Annan and the United Nations as a whole were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2001. Ruggie’s mandate as UN Special Representative was to propose measures by states and corporations to reduce the incidence of business-related human rights harms to people and communities. In 2008 the UN Human Rights Council unanimously welcomed the “Protect, Respect and Remedy” Framework he proposed to better manage these risks, and asked him to further operationalize it. For this achievement, Ethical Corporation magazine named Ruggie among its top 10 “Ethical Leaders” for 2008. And in December 2009 the Financial Times reported that “Professor Ruggie has won unprecedented backing across the battle lines from both business and pressure groups for his proposals for tougher international standards for business and governments.” In June 2011, the UN Human Rights Council unanimously endorsed the “Guiding Principles for Business and Human Rights” Professor Ruggie developed, which now constitutes the most authoritative set of global standards in this domain.

e: john_ruggie@ksg.harvard.edu
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Mary Ruggie

ruggieMary Ruggie, Adjunct Professor of Public Policy, teaches courses on comparative health policy, inequalities in health care, and gender and health. She has a PhD in sociology from the University of California at Berkeley, and has taught at Barnard College, the University of California at San Diego, and Columbia University, where she was Chair of the Department of Sociology. Her publications include The State and Working Women: A Comparison of Britain and Sweden and Realignments in the Welfare State: Health Policy in the U.S., Britain and Canada. Her newest book is Marginal to Mainstream: Alternative Medicine in America (Cambridge University Press, 2004).
e: mary_ruggie@ksg.harvard.edu
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Tony Saich

saichAnthony Saich is the Director of the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, the Daewoo Professor of International Affairs, the Director of the Rajawali Foundation Institute for Asia and Faculty Chair of the China Public Policy Program. This work includes significant training programs for national and local officials from China. He also sits on the Executive Committees of the Fairbank Center and the University's Asia Center. In addition, he is the Harvard representative of the Kennedy Memorial Trust. From 1994 until July 1999, he was the Representative for the China Office of the Ford Foundation. Prior to this, he was Director of the Sinological Institute at Leiden University, the Netherlands. He first visited China as a student in 1976-77 and has been there for longer or shorter trips almost each year since. Currently, he is also a guest Professor at the School of Public Policy and Management at Tsinghua University, China. He has advised a wide range of government, private and not-for-profit organizations on work in China and elsewhere in Asia. He is a member of the Trustees of the China Medical Board of New York and International Bridges to Justice. His current research focuses on the interplay between state and society in Asia and the respective roles they play in the provision of public goods and services at the local level. He has written several books on developments in China, including China's Science Policy in the 80s (1989); Revolutionary Discourse in Mao's China (1994, with David E. Apter); The Rise to Power of the Chinese Communist Party (1996); Providing Public Goods in Transitional China (2008) and The Governance and Politics of China (2011, 3rd edition). He has edited books on the reform of China's financial sector (2005, with Yasheng Huang and Edward Steinfeld), HIV/AIDS (2006, with Joan Kaufman and Arthur Kleinman) and on China's urbanization (2008, with Shahid Yusuf). He studied political science in the U.K. and has taught at universities in China, England, Holland, and the U.S.
e: anthony_saich@ksg.harvard.edu
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F. M. Scherer

schererF. M. Scherer is Aetna Professor Emeritus at the Kennedy School of Government, and lecturer at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School. His research specialties are industrial economics and the economics of technological change. Scherer has taught at several universities including Northwestern, Swarthmore College and the Central European University. He was chief economist at the Federal Trade Commission from 1974-76. Scherer earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan and received his M.B.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University and an honorary doctorate from the University of Hohenheim, Germany. He has authored several books including International High-Technology Competition; Competition Policies for an Integrated World Economy; Mergers, Sell-offs, and Economic Efficiency (with David J. Ravenscraft); and New Perspectives on Economic Growth and Technological Innovation. He is past president of the Industrial Organization Society and the International Joseph A. Schumpeter Society, past vice president of the American Economic Association and the Southern Economic Association, and a member of the Review of Industrial Organization board of editors. See Professor Scherer's Personal Homepage.
e: mike_scherer@ksg.harvard.edu
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Robert Stavins | Blog

stavinsRobert Stavins is the Albert Pratt Professor of Business and Government, director of the Harvard Environmental Economics Program, co-chair of the Harvard Business School-Kennedy School Joint Degree Program, chair of the Kennedy School's Ph.D. programs, and director of the Harvard Project on International Climate Agreements. Professor Stavins' research focuses on diverse areas of environmental economics and policy, including examinations of design and implementation of market-based policy instruments; innovation and diffusion of energy-efficiency technologies; competitiveness effects of regulation; factors affecting land use change; environmental benefit estimation; positive political economy of policy instrument choice; costs of carbon sequestration; and factors affecting urban water demand. In addition to his research at Harvard, Professor Stavins is the former chair of the Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Economics Advisory Board, the editor of the Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, co-editor of the Journal of Wine Economics, and a member of the editorial councils of other scholarly publications. His most recent books include Public Policy for Environmental Protection and Environmental Economics. He holds a bachelor's degree in philosophy from Northwestern University, a master's in agricultural economics from Cornell and a PhD in economics from Harvard.
e: robert_stavins@ksg.harvard.edu
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Lawrence H. Summers

vogelLawrence H. Summers is Charles W. Eliot University Professor. He served as the 27th president of Harvard University from July 2001 until June 2006. From 1999 to 2001 he served as the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury following his earlier service as Deputy and Under Secretary of the Treasury and as Chief Economist of the World Bank. Prior to his service in Washington, Summers was a professor of economics at Harvard and MIT. His research contributions were recognized when he received the John Bates Clark Medal, given every two years to the outstanding American economist under the age of 40, and when he was the first social scientist to receive the National Science Foundation’s Alan T. Waterman Award for outstanding scientific achievement. He is a member of the National Academy of Science. He received his BS from MIT and his PhD in economics from Harvard. Among his other activities, Lawrence Summers writes a monthly column for the Financial Times, coedits the Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, and serves as a managing director of D. E. Shaw, a major alternative investment firm. He also serves on a number of not-for-profit and for-profit boards. He is on leave in 2010-11 in government service as Director of the National Economic Council.
e: lawrence_summers@ksg.harvard.edu
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Richard Zeckhauser
zeckhauserRichard J. Zeckhauser is Frank P. Ramsey Professor of Political Economy, Kennedy School, Harvard University. He pursues a mix of conceptual and applied research. He is among the world's foremost authorities on economic behavior in the context of uncertainty. (In this context, he is an avid contract bridge player, and placed 1st, 2nd and 3rd in U.S. national championships in the last four years.) Zeckhauser helped to pioneer the field of policy analysis, and has written numerous studies applying these methodologies to a range of public policy issues, in areas such as health care, the environment, and terrorism. The primary challenge facing society, he believes, is to allocate resources in accordance with the preferences of the citizenry. Zeckhauser is a fellow of the Econometric Society, the Institute of Medicine (National Academy of Sciences), and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has written or coauthored more than 230 professional articles and a dozen books or edited books. His current research projects are directed at environmental disasters, deception and reputations, trust in Islamic and Western nations, and the blending of negotiations and auctions. His most recent book, with Peter Schuck, is Targeting in Social Programs: Avoiding Bad Bets, Removing Bad Apples (2006). His book The Patron’s Payoff: Conspicuous Commissions in the Italian Renaissance, with Jonathan Nelson, is forthcoming in 2008. He is writing a book with John Donahue on collaborative undertakings between the public and private sectors.
e: richard_zeckhauser@ksg.harvard.edu
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Andy Zelleke
Andy Zelleke, Lecturer in Public Policy, teaches Organizational Leadership and Governance. His articles on corporate governance have appeared in Sloan Management Review, Harvard Business Review, Directors & Boards, and Corporate Governance: An International Review. He was the project director and a steering committee member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences’ Corporate Responsibility initiative, and co-editor of its publication, Restoring Trust in American Business (MIT Press, 2005); this initiative focused on the responsibilities of various “gatekeepers”—regulators, corporate directors, auditors, business lawyers, investment bankers and journalists—in promoting responsible corporate conduct. Zelleke is also a faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, where he teaches in the negotiation and corporate governance areas. Formerly a practicing business lawyer, Zelleke received an A.B. and Ph.D. (in Organizational Behavior) from Harvard University, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.
e: andy_zelleke@ksg.harvard.edu
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Joseph Aldy
Christopher Avery
Linda Bilmes
Iris Bohnet
Lewis Branscomb
William Clark
John D. Donahue
Mark Fagan
Jeffrey Frankel
Archon Fung
Robert Glauber
Jose Gomez-Ibanez
John Haigh
William W. Hogan
Arnold Howitt
Sheila Jasanoff
Dale Jorgenson
Calestous Juma
Elaine Kamarck
Robert Lawrence
Henry Lee
Herman (Dutch) Leonard
Jennifer Lerner
Richard Light
Brigitte Madrian
Erich Muehlegger
Jane Nelson
Dwight Perkins
Stephen Peterson
Roger Porter
Jay Rosengard
John Gerard Ruggie
Mary Ruggie
Tony Saich
F.M. Scherer
Robert Stavins
Lawrence Summers
Richard Zeckhauser
Andy Zelleke