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PEOPLE

FACULTY CHAIR

Joseph Aldy
Assistant Professor of Public Policy
Joe Aldy
is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, a Nonresident Fellow at Resources for the Future, and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research focuses on climate change policy, energy policy, and mortality risk valuation. In 2009-2010, he served as the Special Assistant to the President for Energy and Environment, reporting through both the National Economic Council and the Office of Energy and Climate Change at the White House. Aldy was a Fellow at Resources for the Future from 2005 to 2008 and served on the staff of the Presidents Council of Economic Advisers from 1997 to 2000. He also served as the Co-Director of the Harvard Project on International Climate Agreements, Co-Director of the International Energy Workshop, and Treasurer for the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists before joining the Obama Administration. He holds a PhD in economics from Harvard University, a Master of Environmental Management degree from the Nicholas School of the Environment, and a BA from Duke University.
e: joseph_aldy@hks.harvard.edu.

FACULTY AFFILIATES

Alan Altshuler
Ruth and Frank Stanton Professor, Urban Policy & Planning, Kennedy School of Government;
Dean, Graduate School of Design

Alan A. Altshuler is Ruth and Frank Stanton Professor of Urban Policy and Planning and Dean of the Graduate School of Design. At the Kennedy School, he has been Academic Dean, Director of the A. Alfred Taubman Center for State and Local Government, and Director of the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston. He was previously Dean of the Graduate School of Public Administration at New York University, Professor of Political Science and Urban Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Secretary of Transportation for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. His books include The City Planning Process; Community Control; The Urban Transportation System; The Future of the Automobile; Regulation for Revenue; Governance and Opportunity in Metropolitan America; and Mega-Projects: The Changing Politics of Urban Public Investment. Altshuler received his BA from Cornell University and his MA and PhD from the University of Chicago.
e: alan_altshuler@harvard.edu

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Max Bazerman
Jesse Isidor Straus Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School
In addition to being the Straus Professor at the Harvard Business School, Professor Bazerman is formally affiliated with the Kennedy School of Government, the Psychology Department, the Institute for Quantitative Social Sciences, the Harvard University Center on the Environment, and the Program on Negotiation. In his prior position at Kellogg, he was the founder and director of the Kellogg Environmental Research Center. He is currently on the board of a number of organizations.
e: mbazerman@hbs.edu

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Lucian Bebchuk
William J. Friedman and Alicia Townsend Friedman Professor of Law, Economics, and Finance
Harvard Law School

Lucian Arye Bebchuk is the William J. Friedman and Alicia Townsend Friedman Professor of Law, Economics, and Finance and Director of the Program on Corporate Governance at Harvard Law School. He is also a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, and an Inaugural fellow of the European Corporate Governance Institute. Trained in both law and economics, Bebchuk holds an LL.M. and S.J.D. from Harvard Law School and an M.A. and Ph.D in Economics from the Harvard Economics Department. Following a three-year fellowship at the Harvard Society of Fellows, he joined the Harvard Law School faculty in 1986 as an assistant professor, becoming a full professor in 1988, and the Friedman Professor of Law, Economics and Finance in 1998.
e: bebchuk@law.harvard.edu

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Lewis Branscomb
Aetna Professor, Public Policy and Corporate Management Emeritus; Director Emeritus of the Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program in the Belfer Center for Science & International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Lewis Branscomb is Public Service Professor of Public Policy and Corporate Management in the Aetna Chair Emeritus and former Chair of the Program on Science, Technology and Public Policy (1986 – 1996) in the Belfer Center in HKS.  He is also Adjunct Professor at the University of California, San Diego and Distinguished Research Fellow in the Institute for Global Conflict and Cooperation of the University of California. A former Director of the National Bureau of Standards (1969 – 1972, now NIST) and Vice President and Chief Scientist of IBM (1972 – 1986), he served as Chairman of the National Science Board (1980 – 1984). A pioneer in negative ion photodetachment, he is author of books on science and technology policy, disaster resilience and counter terrorism, and early stage technology innovation.  His AB in physics is from Duke University (summa cum laude, 1945) and physics PhD in 1950 from Harvard, where he was a Junior Fellow in the Society of Fellows.
e: lewis_branscomb@ksg.harvard.edu

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Akash Deep
Senior Lecturer of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
Akash Deep is Senior Lecturer in Public Policy specializing in finance and cochair of the Indian Administrative Service Executive Education program. His expertise lies in financial risk management and derivatives, infrastructure project finance, and the management and regulation of banks and financial institutions. Deep teaches finance, risk management, and infrastructure finance in the degree and executive programs. He has provided advice on bank restructuring and infrastructure financing to various governments and firms. He has worked in the financial institutions and infrastructure section of the Bank for International Settlements in Switzerland and served as consultant to the World Bank and United Nations. Certified Financial Risk Manager by the Global Association of Risk Professionals, Deep holds a PhD in economics and an MA in operations research from Yale University and a bachelor's degree from the Indian Institute of Technology.
e: akash_deep@harvard.edu

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Einer Elhauge
Carroll and Milton Petri Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
Einer Elhauge is the Petrie Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and faculty director of the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology and Bioethics. He teaches a gamut of courses ranging from Antitrust, Contracts, Corporations, Health Care Law, and Statutory Interpretation. Before coming to Harvard, he was a Professor of Law at the University of California at Berkeley, and clerked for Judge Norris on the 9th Circuit and Justice Brennan on the Supreme Court. He received both his A.B. and his J.D. from Harvard, graduating first in his law school class.
e: elhauge@law.harvard.edu

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Allen Ferrell
Harvey Greenfield Professor of Securities Law, Harvard Law School
Allen Ferrell is a Professor of law at Harvard University and a former Harvard John M. Olin Research Professor in Law, Economics, and Business. He is also a member of the NASD’s Economic Advisory Board. His interests include corporate governance, finance, regulation of financial institutions, and securities regulation.
e: fferrell@law.harvard.edu

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Jeffrey Frankel
James W. Harpel Professor, Capital Formulation & Growth, Harvard Kennedy School
Jeffrey A. Frankel is James W. Harpel Professor of Capital Formation and Growth. He directs the Program in International Finance and Macroeconomics at the National Bureau of Economic Research, where he is also on the Business Cycle Dating Committee, which officially declared the 2001 recession. Nominated by President Clinton in 1996 to be a member of his Council of Economic Advisers, Frankel's responsibilities included international economics, macroeconomics, and the environment. Before coming to Harvard in 1999, he was Professor of Economics at the University of California at Berkeley, having joined the faculty in 1979. Past appointments also include the Federal Reserve, Institute for International Economics, International Monetary Fund, University of Michigan, and Yale University. His research interests include international finance, monetary policy, regional blocs, and international environmental issues. Books include American Economic Policy in the 1990s (2002). Born in San Francisco in 1952, he graduated from Swarthmore College in 1974, and received his economics PhD from MIT in 1978.
e: jeffrey_frankel@ksg.harvard.edu

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Archon Fung
Ford Foundation Professor of Democracy and Citizenship, Harvard Kennedy School;
Co-Director, Transparency Policy Project

Archon Fung is Ford Foundation Professor of Democracy and Citizenship. His research examines the impacts of civic participation, public deliberation, and transparency upon public and private governance. His Empowered Participation: Reinventing Urban Democracy examines two participatory-democratic reform efforts in low-income Chicago neighborhoods. Current projects also examine initiatives in ecosystem management, toxics reduction, endangered species protection, local governance, and international labor standards. His recent books and edited collections include Deepening Democracy: Institutional Innovations in Empowered Participatory Governance; Can We Eliminate Sweatshops?; Working Capital: The Power of Labors Pensions; and Beyond Backyard Environmentalism. His articles on regulation, rights, and participation appear in Political Theory; Journal of Political Philosophy; Politics and Society; Governance; Environmental Management; American Behavioral Scientist; and Boston Review. Fung received two SBs and a PhD from MIT.
e: archon_fung@ksg.harvard.edu

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Jose Gomez-Ibanez
Derek C. Bok Professor, Urban Planning & Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
Jose A. Gomez-Ibanez is Derek C. Bok Professor of Urban Planning and Public Policy. His research interests are primarily in the areas of transportation policy and urban development and privatization and regulation of infrastructure. He has served as a consultant for a variety of public agencies. His recent publications include Regulating Infrastructure: Monopoly, Contracts, and Discretion; Regulation for Revenue: The Political Economy of Land Use Exactions (with Alan Altshuler); Going Private: The International Experience with Transport Privatization (with John R. Meyer); and Essays on Transport Policy and Economics (editor).
e: jose_gomez-ibanez@harvard.edu

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James K. Hammitt
Professor of Economics & Decision Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health
Professor Hammitt's research concerns the development and application of quantitative methods—including benefit-cost, decision, and risk analysis—to health and environmental policy. Topics include management of long-term environmental issues with important scientific uncertainties, such as global climate change and stratospheric-ozone depletion, evaluation of ancillary benefits and countervailing risks associated with risk-control measures, and characterization of social preferences over health and environmental risks using revealed-preference, contingent-valuation, and health-utility methods.
e: jkh@harvard.edu

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Paul M. Healy
James R. Williston Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School
Paul Healy joined Harvard Business School as a Professor of Business Administration in 1997. His primary teaching interests include corporate financial reporting and analysis, corporate governance, and corporate finance. Professor Healy received his B.C.A. Honors (1st Class) in Accounting and Finance from Victoria University, New Zealand in 1977, his M.S. in Economics from the University of Rochester in 1981, his Ph.D. in Business from the University of Rochester in 1983, and is a New Zealand CPA. In New Zealand, Professor Healy worked for Arthur Young and ICI. Prior to joining Harvard, Professor Healy spent fourteen years on the faculty at the M.I.T. Sloan School of Management, where he received awards for teaching excellence in 1991, 1992, and 1997. He is the coauthor (with Professors Krishna G. Palepu and Victor Bernard) of one of the leading financial analysis textbooks, Business Analysis and Valuation. In 1993-94 he served as Deputy Dean at the Sloan School, and in 1994-95 he visited London Business School and Harvard Business School.
e: phealy@hbs.edu

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William W. Hogan
Raymond Plank Professor of Global Energy Policy, Harvard Kennedy School;
Research Director, Harvard Electricity Policy Group

William W. Hogan, Raymond Plank Professor of Global Energy Policy, and Chair of the Appointments Committee. He is research director of the Harvard Electricity Policy Group (HEPG), which is examining alternative strategies for a more competitive electricity market. Hogan has been a member of the faculty of Stanford University where he founded the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), and he is a past president of the International Association for Energy Economics (IAEE). Current research focuses on major energy industry restructuring, network pricing and access issues, market design, and energy policy in nations worldwide. Hogan received his undergraduate degree from the U.S. Air Force Academy and his PhD from UCLA. Selected papers are available on his Web site, www.whogan.com.
e: William_Hogan@harvard.edu

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Howell Jackson
James S. Reid, Jr. Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
Howell Jackson is Vice Dean for Budget, and the James S. Reid, Jr., Professor of Law at Harvard Law School where he teaches courses on the regulation of financial institutions, securities regulation, pension law, international finance, and analytical methods for lawyers. His research currently deals with the regulation of international securities market, reform of the social security system, problems in consumer finance, and comparative cost-benefit analyses of financial regulation. He is co-author of the Regulation of Financial Institutions (West 1999) and Analytical Methods for Lawyers (Foundation Press 2003) and author of numerous scholarly articles. Professor Jackson has served as a consultant to the United States Treasury Department in connection with the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act and also as an adviser to the United Nations Development Progamme, the World Bank/International Monetary Fund, and the Harvard Institute for International Development in connection with various projects involving the reform of financial systems in other countries. Prior to joining the Harvard Law School faculty in 1989, Professor Jackson served as a law clerk to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and practiced law in Washington, D.C. He received a JD-MBA degree from Harvard University in 1982 and a B.A. from Brown University in 1976.
e: hjackson@law.harvard.edu

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Sheila Jasanoff
Pforzheimer Professor of Science & Technology Studies, Harvard Kennedy School
Sheila Jasanoff is Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies. She has held academic positions at Cornell, Yale, Cambridge, Oxford, and Kyoto. At Cornell, she founded and chaired the Department of Science and Technology Studies. She has been Karl Deutsch Guest Professor at the Science Center Berlin and Fellow at the Berlin Institute for Advanced Study. Her research concerns the role of science and technology in the law, politics, and public policy of modern democracies, with particular focus on the regulation of biotechnology and the environment in the United States, Europe, and India. Her books include Controlling Chemicals, The Fifth Branch, Science at the Bar, and Designs on Nature. Jasanoff has served on the Board of Directors of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and as President of the Society for Social Studies of Science. She holds AB, JD, and PhD degrees from Harvard University and an honorary doctorate from the University of Twente.
e: sheila_jasanoff@harvard.edu

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Elaine Kamarck
Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
Elaine C. Kamarck is a Lecturer in Public Policy who came to the Kennedy School in 1997 after a career in politics and government. In the 1980s, she was one of the founders of the New Democrat movement that helped elect Bill Clinton president. She served in the White House from 1993 to 1997, where she created and managed the Clinton administration's National Performance Review, also known as reinventing government. At the Kennedy School she served as Director of Visions of Governance for the Twenty-First Century and as Faculty Advisor to the Innovations in American Government Awards Program. In 2000, she took a leave of absence to work as Senior Policy Advisor to the Al Gore presidential campaign. She conducts research on American politics, 21st century government, and governmental reform and innovation. She is author of The End of Government as We Know It. Kamarck received her PhD in political science from the University of California, Berkeley.
e: elaine_kamarck@harvard.edu

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Robert Lawrence
Albert L. Williams Professor of International Trade & Investment, Harvard Kennedy School
Robert Z. Lawrence is Albert L. Williams Professor of International Trade and Investment, a Senior Fellow at the Institute for International Economics, and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He served as a member of the President's Council of Economic Advisers from 1998 to 2000. Lawrence has also been a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution. He has taught at Yale University, where he received his PhD in economics. His research focuses on trade policy. He is the author of Crimes and Punishments? Retaliation under the WTO; Regionalism, Multilateralism and Deeper Integration; Single World, Divided Nations?; and Can America Compete? He is coauthor of Has Globalization Gone Far Enough? The Costs of Fragmentation in OECD Markets (with Scott Bradford); A Prism on Globalization; Globaphobia: Confronting Fears About Open Trade; A Vision for the World Economy; and Saving Free Trade: A Pragmatic Approach. Lawrence has served on the advisory boards of the Congressional Budget Office, the Overseas Development Council, and the Presidential Commission on United States-Pacific Trade and Investment Policy.
e: robert_lawrence@harvard.edu

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Richard Lazarus
Howard and Katherine Aibel Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
Richard Lazarus is the Howard and Katherine Aibel Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, where he teaches environmental law, natural resources Law, Supreme Court advocacy, and torts. Professor Lazarus has represented the United States, state and local governments, and environmental groups in the United States Supreme Court in 40 cases and has presented oral argument in 13 of those cases. His primary areas of legal scholarship are environmental and natural resources law, with particular emphasis on constitutional law and the Supreme Court. He has published two books, The Making of Environmental Law (U. Chicago 2004), and Environmental Law Stories (Aspen Press, co-edited with O. Houck 2005). He was also the principal author of Deep Water - The Gulf Oil Disaster and the Future of Offshore Drilling (GPO 2011), which is the Report to the President of the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling Commission, for which he served as the Executive Director. The Commission was charged with investigating the root causes of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 and recommending changes in law and policy to reduce the risk of future spills and to mitigate their impacts. Prior to joining the Harvard law faculty, Professor Lazarus was the Justice William J. Brennan, Jr., Professor of Law at Georgetown University, where he also founded the Supreme Court Institute. He graduated from Harvard Law School in 1979 and has a B.S. in chemistry and a B.A. in economics from the University of Illinois.

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Henry Lee
Lecturer, Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School;
Jaidah Family Director, Environment & Natural Resources Program, Belfer Center for Science & International Affairs

Henry Lee is a Senior Lecturer in Public Policy, the Jassim M. Jaidah Family Director of the Environment and Natural Resources Program within the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Co-Chair of the Kennedy School's Program on Infrastructure in a Market Economy, and Co-Principal Investigator of the Energy, Technology, and Policy Project. Before joining the school, Lee spent nine years in Massachusetts state government as Director of the state's Energy Office and Special Assistant to the Governor for Environmental Policy. He has served on numerous state, federal, and private advisory committees and boards focusing on both energy and environmental issues and spent 12 years working with power developers in the United States and East Asia. His recent research interests focus on energy policy, energy and transportation, global climate change, geopolitics of oil and gas, and public infrastructure projects in developing countries. He is the author of several recent articles on China's oil strategies and a forthcoming paper on the economic viability of electric vehicles.
e: henry_lee@harvard.edu

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Erich Muehlegger
Associate Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
Erich Muehlegger is an Associate Professor of Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School and a fellow of the National Bureau of Economics Research, the Harvard Environmental Economics Program, and the Harard University Center for the Environment. His research interests include industrial organization, economic regulation, and environmental policy. One set of ongoing research projects study the effect of regulation on illegal activity including estimating the effects of regulatory innovation on fuel tax evasion and modeling cross-border cigarette excise tax avoidance. A second set of projects focus on environment regulation of energy industries, including estimating consumer preferences for fuel economy, simulating automaker response to fuel economy regulation, and estimating the relative efficacy of different hybrid vehicle incentives. He received his PhD in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2005, where his resesarch studied market impacts of state and local environmental regulation of gasoline content.
e: erich_muehlegger@ksg.harvard.edu

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Roger Porter
IBM Professor, Business & Government, Harvard Kennedy School;
Roger B. Porter is IBM Professor of Business and Government. Joining the Kennedy School faculty in 1977, he has served for more than a decade in senior economic policy positions in the White House, most recently as Assistant to the President for Economic and Domestic Policy from 1989 to 1993. He served as Director of the White House Office of Policy Development in the Reagan Administration and as Executive Secretary of the President's Economic Policy Board during the Ford Administration. He is the author of several books on economic policy, including Presidential Decision Making and Efficiency, Equity and Legitimacy: The Multilateral Trading System at the Millennium. An alumnus of Brigham Young University, Porter was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University, where he received his BPhil degree. He was a White House Fellow from 1974 to 1975 and received his MA and PhD degrees from Harvard University.
e: roger_porter@harvard.edu

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John G. Ruggie
Berthold Beitz Professor in Human Rights and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Faculty Chair, Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative

John G. Ruggie is the Berthold Beitz Professor in Human Rights and International Affairs and an Affiliated Professor in International Legal Studies at Harvard Law School. Trained as a political scientist, Ruggie has made significant intellectual contributions to the study of international relations,focusing on the impact of economic and other forms of globalization on global rule making. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts& Sciences, and a recent survey published in Foreign Policy magazine identified him as one of the 25 most influential international relations scholars in the United States and Canada. He has won awards from the American Political Science Association and the International Studies Association. Apart from his academic pursuits, Ruggie has long been involved in practical policy work, initially as a consultant to various agencies of the United Nations and the United States government. From 1997-2001 he served as United Nations Assistant Secretary-General for Strategic Planning a post created specifically for him by then Secretary-General Kofi Annan. His areas of responsibility included establishing and overseeing the UN Global Compact, now the worlds largest corporate citizenship initiative;proposing and gaining General Assembly approval for the Millennium Development Goals; advising the Secretary-General on relations with Washington; and broadly contributing to the effort at institutional renewal for which the Secretary-General and the United Nations as a whole were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2001. In 2005, responding to a request by the UN Commission on Human Rights (nowHuman Rights Council), Annan appointed Ruggie as the Secretary-Generals Special Representative for Business and Human Rights, a post he continues to hold in the new UN administration of BanKi-Moon. In that capacity, his job is to propose measures to strengthen the human rights performance of the business sector around the world.
e: john_ruggie@harvard.edu

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David S. Scharfstein
Edmund Cogswell Converse Professor of Finance and Banking at Harvard Business School
David S. Scharfstein is the Edmund Cogswell Converse Professor of Finance and Banking at Harvard Business School.   His research focuses on banking, financial distress, risk management, housing finance, venture capital and corporate investment. He teaches the introductory finance course in the MBA program and the Ph.D. corporate finance course. Previously, he has taught courses on private equity and venture capital. Prior to joining the Harvard Business School faculty in 2003, Scharfstein was for 16 years on the finance faculty of MIT's Sloan School of Management, most recently as the Dai Ichi Kangyo Professor of Management.  He has been Editor of the Rand Journal of Economics, Associate Editor of the Journal of Finance and Review of Financial Studies, and Director of the American Finance Association.  He has received fellowships from the Sloan Foundation, Batterymarch Financial Management, and the Olin Foundation, as well as a Fulbright Scholarship at Oxford University.  Scharfstein is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is also a member of the Squam Lake Working Group on Financial Regulation, a nonpartisan, nonaffiliated group of fifteen leading economists which offers guidance on financial regulatory reform and recently published The Squam Lake Report: Fixing the Financial System (Princeton University Press). During 2009-10 Scharfstein served as Senior Advisor to the Secretary of the U.S. Treasury. Scharfstein has a Ph.D in Economics from MIT (1986) and an A.B. summa cum laude from Princeton University (1982). 

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F.M. Scherer
Professor of Public Policy and Corporate Management in the Aetna Chair, Emeritus,
Harvard Kennedy School

F.M. Scherer is Professor of Public Policy and Corporate Management in the Aetna Chair, Emeritus. From 1974 to 1976, he was chief economist at the Federal Trade Commission. His research specialties are industrial economics and the economics of technological change, leading inter alia to books on Industrial Market Structure and Economic Performance (third edition with David Ross); The Economics of Multi-Plant Operation: An International Comparisons Study (with three coauthors); International High-Technology Competition; Competition Policies for an Integrated World Economy; Mergers, Sell-offs, and Economic Efficiency (with David J. Ravenscraft); Innovation and Growth: Schumpeterian Perspectives; and The Weapons Acquisition Process (two volumes, one with M. J. Peck).
e: mike_scherer@harvard.edu

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Hal S. Scott
Nomura Professor, International Financial Systems
Director, International Financial Systems Program at Harvard Law School

Hal S. Scott is the Nomura Professor and Director of the Program on International Financial Systems at Harvard Law School, where he has taught since 1975. He teaches courses on Capital Markets Regulation, International Finance, the Payment System, and Securities Regulation. He has a B.A. from Princeton University (Woodrow Wilson School, 1965), an M.A. from Stanford University in Political Science (1967), and a J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School (1972). He has been admitted to practice in Massachusetts and various federal courts including the Supreme Court. In 1974-1975, before joining Harvard, he clerked for Justice Byron White.
e: hscott@law.harvard.edu

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Malcolm K. Sparrow
Professor of Practice of Public Management, Harvard Kennedy School
Malcolm K. Sparrow is Professor of the Practice of Public Management and Faculty Chair of the Executive Program on Strategic Management of Regulatory and Enforcement Agencies. He served 10 years with the British Police Service, rising to the rank of Detective Chief Inspector. He has conducted internal affairs investigations, commanded a tactical firearms unit, and has had extensive experience with criminal investigation. Recent publications include: The Regulatory Craft: Controlling Risks, Solving Problems, and Managing Compliance; and License to Steal: How Fraud Bleeds America's Health Care System. His research interests include regulatory and enforcement strategy, fraud control, and risk management and analysis. He is also a patent-holding inventor in the area of computerized fingerprint analysis and is dead serious at tennis. He holds an MA in mathematics from Cambridge University, an MPA from the Kennedy School, and a PhD in applied mathematics.
e: msparrow@ksg.harvard.edu

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Robert N. Stavins
Albert Pratt Professor of Business & Government, Harvard Kennedy School;
Director, Harvard Environmental Economics Program

Robert N. Stavins is Albert Pratt Professor of Business and Government, Director of Graduate Studies for the Doctoral Programs in Public Policy and in Political Economy and Government, Cochair of the MPP/MBA and MPA/ID/MBA Joint Degree Programs, and Director of the Harvard Environmental Economics Program. He is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a University Fellow of Resources for the Future, former Chair of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Economics Advisory Board, and a member of the editorial councils of scholarly periodicals. His research has examined diverse areas of environmental economics and policy and has appeared in a variety of economics, law, and policy journals, as well as several books. Stavins directed Project 88, a bipartisan effort cochaired by former Senator Timothy Wirth and the late Senator John Heinz to develop innovative approaches to environmental problems. He has been a consultant to government agencies, international organizations, corporations, and advocacy groups. He holds a BA in philosophy from Northwestern University, an MS in agricultural economics from Cornell, and a PhD in economics from Harvard.
e: robert_stavins@harvard.edu

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Cass R. Sunstein
Felix Frankfurter Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

Michael W. Toffel
Associate Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School
Professor Toffel's research examines the adoption and effectiveness of environmental, safety, and quality programs. His research on regulatory effectiveness has examined the effects of OSHA inspections on worker safety, the effects of companies’ disclosing regulatory violations to the regulator under the US EPA’s voluntary “audit policy” program, and identifying the effects of a US EPA toxic chemical information disclosure regulation on subsequent pollution levels. His research on industry-self regulation has examined corporate environmental ratings, international environmental and quality standards, and suppliers’ adherence to buyer’s codes-of-conduct governing factory conditions including environmental and safety issues. His research has been published in management, economic, and engineering academic journals, as well as in MIT Sloan Management Review, California Management Review, and The Atlantic. Professor Toffel received a Ph.D. in Business Administration from University of California--Berkeley, an MBA and Master’s in Environmental Management from Yale University, and a BA in Government from Lehigh University.
e: mtoffel@hbs.edu

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Richard J. Zeckhauser
Frank Plumpton Ramsey Professor of Political Economy, Harvard Kennedy School
Richard Zeckhauser is the Frank Plumpton Ramsey Professor of Political Economy at the Kennedy School of Government. Zeckhauser pursues a mix of conceptual and applied research. His ongoing policy investigations explore ways to promote human health, to help labor and financial markets operate more efficiently, and to foster informed and appropriate choices by individuals and government agencies. Zeckhauser's current major research addresses the performance of institutions confronted with inadequate commitment capabilities, incomplete information flow, and human participants who fail to behave in accordance with models of rationality. Financial markets and health risks are the subjects of his major empirical investigations.
e: richard_zeckhauser@harvard.edu

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AFFILIATED FELLOW

Lisa Robinson
Senior Fellow, Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government

Lisa A. Robinson is currently a Senior Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government and a Research Associate at the Harvard School of Public Health. She specializes in the economic analysis of environmental, health, and safety policies and regulations. For the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and other organizations, she has led numerous assessments of the costs, benefits, and other impacts of policy options, developed related methods, and drafted guidance documents. Her recent work focuses on the conduct of benefit-cost analysis, particularly for policies with outcomes that cannot be fully valued using market measures. For example, she co-edited the National Academies book, Valuing Health for Regulatory Cost-Effectiveness Analysis, and developed approaches for estimating the value of mortality risk reductions (the value per statistical life, or VSL) for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the World Bank. She also explored the implications of behavioral economics for benefit-cost analysis, and is now investigating options for enhancing the analysis of employment impacts and distributional effects. Ms. Robinson worked previously at the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis and was a Principal at Industrial Economics, Incorporated. She was also the Director of Policy, Planning, and Budget for an independent federal agency and an analyst at the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. She is a Councilor of the Society for Risk Analysis and the past-Chair of its Economics and Benefits Analysis Specialty Group, as well as the Vice President of the Society for Benefit-Cost Analysis. She is on the editorial boards of Risk Analysis and the Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis. She received her Master in Public Policy degree from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government.
e: lisa_robinson@hks.harvard.edu
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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Jennifer Nash
Executive Director, Regulatory Policy Program

Jennifer Nash is Associate Director of M-RCBG and executive director of the Regulatory Policy Program.She returned to M-RCBG in 2011 after studying the regulation of nanotechnologies at Northeastern University and serving as Director of Policy and Programs at the Product Stewardship Institute. From 2001 to 2008 she was Director of M-RCBG’s Regulatory Policy Program, and from 2006-2008 she was Executive Director of the Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative. She co-edited (with Cary Coglianese) two books on environmental policy innovation, Leveraging the Private Sector (2006) and Regulating from the Inside (2001) and has published in journals such as Administrative Law Review; Annual Review of Energy and the Environment; Business, Strategy, and the Environment; California Management Review; Ecology Law Quarterly; Environment; Environmental Law Reporter; Environmental Science and Technology; Issues in Science and Technology; and Resources, Conservation, and Recycling.  She is a member of the American Chemistry Council’s advisory panel on Responsible Care and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology.
e: jennifer_nash@harvard.edu


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PEOPLE QUICK LINKS

FACULTY
Joseph Aldy, Faculty Chair

Alan Altshuler
Max Bazerman
Lucian Bebchuk
Lewis Branscomb
Akash Deep
Einer Elhauge
Allen Ferrell
Jeffrey Frankel
Archon Fung
Jose Gomez-Ibanez
James K. Hammitt
Paul M. Healy
William W. Hogan
Howell Jackson
Sheila Jasanoff
Elaine Kamarck
Richard Lazarus
Robert Lawrence
Henry Lee
Erich Muehlegger
Roger Porter
John G. Ruggie
David S. Scharfstein
F.M. Scherer
Hal S. Scott
Malcolm K. Sparrow
Robert N. Stavins
Cass R. Sunstein
Michael W. Toffel
Richard J. Zeckhauser

AFFILIATED FELLOW
Lisa Robinson

Executive Director
Jennifer Nash

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